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The Catechism Of The Catholic Church: Christology

1054 words - 5 pages

According to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, in 1984 Pope John Paul II took a suggestion from the Extraordinary Synod of Bishops and commissioned a select group of Cardinals and Bishops to create a single document that represented the collection of Christian principles (usccb.org). This document was originally intended to be used as a guide for the teaching of the Catholic faith and values by bishops and priests, as well serving as a general guiding light for those studying and following the faith. In the summer of 1992, The Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) was approved and that winter, Pope John Paul II revealed the book to the world (usccb.org). While the CCC ...view middle of the document...

Only after Jesus’ crucifixion does Peter then announces that Jesus’ true connection with God was as Lord and Christ to the people of God (440). Interestingly, the title of Christ is accepted by Jesus because he is the anointed one; the word Christ means anointed in Hebrew.
According to the Old Testament, the term, ‘son of God’ could have meant nothing more than a human chosen by God to be the earthly king of the people of Israel (441). Son of God; however, signifies the unique and eternal relationship that Jesus has with his Father. Both Peter and Paul affirm that Jesus is the preordained Son of God and Jesus himself instructs his disciples to pray with him by speaking, ‘my Father and your Father’, further distinguishing his relationship with God as his one and only Son from theirs as a son of God (443).
The CCC provides an insightful and educational experience to the uninitiated of the Christian faith. One example is the teaching of the Hebrew name for Jesus which is Yahweh meaning Lord. Jesus himself uses the title indicating his duty as the Lord of humanity which is starkly different from the title lord given to a ruler of a specific portion of humanity as when addressing a noble. This differentiation is important because to profess that Jesus is Lord is to acknowledge your belief in the Holy Spirit (455). Christians recognize this separation and practice the affirmation in the Christian prayers with meaningful phrases such as, ‘The Lord be with you’ and ‘through Christ our Lord’ (451).
As stated above, the reason that God gave his only Son to man was out of his love for man and his desire to offer man a way to salvation. Mankind, which had fallen and become tainted by sin, would we be saved and have our sins wiped from us and into Jesus but only by God’s grace. He would assume our sins and therefore mankind...

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