This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Catholic Church And Reformation Essay

1305 words - 6 pages

In 16th century Europe the Catholic Church had become extremely powerful, and with this power came corruption. Two men stood to change the direction of Europe forever. The first Martin Luther was the decided leader of the Protestant Reformation and St Ignatius de Loyola was the leader of the Counter Reformation. These men did not know the impact they were to have on the Europe and the world, but in this essay I will explain who these men are and their impacts on the world as we know it.
Martin Luther was born in 1483. He was born a Catholic as that was the religion of the time. Marin Luther’s life was predetermined to become a lawyer, but instead he chose the path of becoming a monk. ...view middle of the document...

By the age of 30 he was an officer defending Spain against the French. He broke his leg during the war and during his recuperation took to reading to pass the time. Inigo found a book of the life of Christ, and a book about the saints, after reading these books Inigo found the beginning of his spiritual acumen. Inigo travelled to Jerusalem to live on the grounds that Jesus lived, but was called back to Europe. His dreams of preaching in the Holy Land were over, so he went decided to go back to school to learn the priesthood. Ignatius was not fluent in Latin, which was mandatory when studying preliminarily, so Ignatius began his studies learning Latin. Ignatius went on the study in the university where his enthusiasm seemed to get him into trouble. He spent some time in jail and was told he was not able to teach others as the Spanish Inquisition was very suspicious of those who were not ordained. Ignatius met his two roommates and together they called themselves “Friends in the Lord” centered on Ignatius. The bond found by these friends was fueled by the “Spiritual Exercises” taught by Ignatius. Ignatius finished his studies in France and along with his two friends decided to put themselves at the disposal of the pope in Rome. There they began a period of religious discernment. They were about to begin a process of being spread all over Europe. To maintain the bond they had created, they formed a religious order they called the Society of Jesus. This order was later named the Jesuits, and was approved by Pope Paul III as an official Catholic order. The Spiritual Exercises was written to give guidance on the Jesuit order.
These writings of the Spiritual Exercises and Against Catholicism noted a religious shift in the 1500s. On one hand Against Catholicism showed an obvious rebellion against the Catholic Church exposing the corruption and the misleading of the time. This was called the Reformation or the Protestant Reformation. On the other hand in an effort to maintain the Catholic Church’s place in Europe. This was called the Counter Reformation. The religious shift in Europe was becoming increasingly apparent with the shift being led away from the Catholic Church and the beginning of the religious split between the Protestant north and the Catholic south. The religious impact included the disarray of Christendom (the institution of the Church) and now was divided mainly between the Catholics and the Protestants. Martin Luther translated the first bible in German, and it was now being found within the people to translate scripture for themselves.
The Reformation was not unprecedented, but it changed the European landscape in more ways that just religious. Scandals of the Catholic Church were finally being exposed and the leader of the exposition was Martin Luther. There had been people in the...

Find Another Essay On The Catholic Church and Reformation

Internal Weaknesses of the Catholic Church as the Real Resons for the German Reformation

2044 words - 8 pages were several reasons other than the weaknesses of the Catholic Church that played an important role in causing the German Reformation. Michael Mullett argues wholly that Luther was the cause of the Reformation, while Keith Randell, author of 'Luther and the German Reformation' argues that there were a number of causes such as political, economical, social, and cultural causes. The Church argues Lotherington is the most

Evaluate the reaction of the Catholic Church to the Protestant Reformation

1078 words - 4 pages The Protestant Reformation was the natural culmination of the abuses of the Roman Catholic Church. For centuries before the time of Martin Luther and the period recognized as "The Reformation", clergy and laity alike had complained of the abuses of the Church. Had the Church listened sooner, the abuses could have been rectified, and the protests could have been quelled. Once the Roman Catholic Church realized that something must be done (around

The Lutheran Church and The Catholic Church

1052 words - 5 pages officially formed on January 1, 1988 and was a combination of three branches of the Lutheran religion: the American Lutheran church, the Association of Evangelical Lutheran churches, and the Lutheran Church in America. In 2012 the ELCA had 3,950,924 baptized members. Today, it is the seventh largest religious body and largest Lutheran denomination in the U.S. Luther, born in 1483, was a German monk and priest of the Catholic Church. While

AIDS - and the Catholic Church

1231 words - 5 pages proposals are impractical and inhumane to deny a dying person his or her right to peace and time with family in their last moments. People living with HIV/AIDS face discrimination which is dehumanizing and suffering which strips the person's sense of worth and dignity. Tackling the problematic AIDS isn't easy, and ethics, morals and strong influence from the Catholic Church are all contributors to this issue.AIDS has seen the country of Africa

Chaucer and the Catholic Church

1023 words - 5 pages By the late 14th century, the Catholic Church was the main influential power in Europe. As the clergy’s influence increased, the continent’s wealth began to decline. Amidst a century of poverty, plague, and unemployment, criticism of the church arose. The people deemed the clergy hypocritical for preaching against greed, but yet keeping all of the wealth to themselves. Cathedrals were built as shrines, embellished in gold and rich jewels

Martin luther and the catholic reformation

2795 words - 11 pages Primarily one man brought out the reformation that occurred in the 16th century. This one man is Martin Luther. He changed the whole political and judicial status through his teachings and beliefs that he boldly voiced and argued throughout his lifetime. Among these controversial ideas were his 95 theses, which changed the Catholic Church. Without the work of Martin Luther, education, economy and life would not be the same today. He had such

King Arthur And The Catholic Church

603 words - 2 pages The Catholic Church has many influences on King Arthur and the rest of his Knights of the Round Table. The knights depended on the church for its teachings and the great power the church held in society. The Knights of the Round Table pledged great loyalty to the church. Also the knights held the teachings of the church in great reverence and were never disloyal to the church. There are many links between the Catholic Church and the way that

Napoleon Bonaparte and the Catholic Church

2182 words - 9 pages Tension grew between the Catholic Church and France during the French Revolution, leading to a schism, which deeply devastated the Church’s economy. Pope Pius VII and Napoleon Bonaparte came into power as the French Revolution was ending. For different reasons they both saw the importance of restoring Roman Catholicism’s position in France. The Catholic Church’s initial support of Napoleon greatly affected both parties (O’Dwyer 12-14, 43, 49

History and the Roman Catholic Church

3239 words - 13 pages History and Christianity Christianity most specifically, the Holy Roman Catholic Church has been involved in the world throughout time. Since Christianity, when if first became a major religion in society the involvement of the Roman Catholic Church has affected many areas of history. The Roman Catholic Church has affected the world historically, as demonstrated by it's impact upon the historical figures like Hypatia, Joan of Arc, and Jan Hus

History and the Roman Catholic Church

3270 words - 13 pages Sometimes during interrogations of “witches”, the Roman Catholic Church did not oversee the tortures, exempting the rule of shedding no blood. In this instance, people accused of being witches could be skinned alive, disemboweled, drawn and quartered, or any other variation of many torturous forms of punishment. Most commonly, death and torture was done by burning at the stake. At the death of the “witch” the Roman Catholic Church would order

Magdalene Laundries: Society and the Catholic Church

1251 words - 6 pages inmates were beaten, dehumanized, humiliated and stripped of their dignity. This film, based on the documentary Sex in a Cold Climate, highlights the reciprocal influence of the Catholic Church and society that formed the views and treatment of women, which ultimately led to the creation and perpetuation of Magdalene laundries until 1996. Following the creation of the Irish Free State, the heavily intertwined nature of Irish society and Catholicism

Similar Essays

The Reformation Of The Roman Catholic Church

1036 words - 4 pages unification for the first time inthousands of years.The Reformation could have its earliest roots traced back to the days of Huss andWycliff who were the first people to speak out publicly against the practices of theRoman Catholic Church. However, it was Martin Luther who in 1517 really gathered thesupport of angry, fed-up citizens to establish Protestantism. Why Luther succeeded inconvincing the people when Huss and Wycliff didn't, was really based on

The Decline Of The Roman Catholic Church During The Reformation

641 words - 3 pages The Roman Catholic Church's decline during the Reformation was clearly not caused by a single event or action. Indeed, numerous self-inflicted and externally inflicted wounds were imposed in the Church. Self-inflicted wounds hurting the Church included the decline in papal credibility and ill will amongst clerical authority. The latter of these two wounds entailed regional biases among nearly every the archdiocese leading to a Great Schism in

Roman Catholic Church Reformation: Martin Luther

853 words - 4 pages On the 31st of October 1517 was the beginning of the reformation when Martin Luther Posted up his Ninety-Five Theses on the door of the Roman Catholic Church and published in Wittenberg, Germany. The Reformation Became the Basis for the founding of Protestantism, one of the three major branches of Christianity. Luther had far-reaching political, economic and social effects. But the main question is why Martin Luther was able to successfully

The Internal Weaknesses Of The Catholic Church Were The Real Reasons For The German Reformation

1709 words - 7 pages German Reformation. Michael Mullett argues wholly that Luther was the cause of the Reformation, while Keith Randell, author of 'Luther and the German Reformation' argues that there were a number of causes such as political, economical, social, and cultural causes.The Church argues Lotherington is the most important key issue for the cause of the German Reformation. Lotherington quotes, "The Roman Catholic Church was intent on exploiting Germany