This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Causes And Consequences Of Genocide

1061 words - 4 pages

"The twentieth century was termed the 'century of genocide' because of the high number of cases of genocide during that time period," (Maritz 2012). Genocide is the deliberate killing of people who belong to a particular racial, political, or cultural group. It is said to originate from the ideals of Enlightenment, which makes men have the desire to control nature and, therefore, other people. The extermination of a group of people is done to establish a 'perfect society'. Genocide happens mostly because of prejudices. Groups are sometimes formed to think anyone outside the group is an alien and that being different is bad. "Ethnic and cultural distinctions often result in the formation of 'in-group' and 'out-group' thinking, where members of different races, religions, or cultures view each other as separate, alien, and 'different'," (McMorran, and Schultz 2003). It also happens sometimes because there is economic or political instability and limited resources. In general, genocide is a dreadful thing, except for countries with economic struggles and low rescources.
Genocide causes a lack of diversity, which makes the economy of a country weak. This is relevant because the economy of a country is what holds it together, therefore it is a downside to genocide. It is effective because the countries fall apart when they cannot fund citizens, and that is a bad thing. Diversity also promotes economic growth."...diversity spurs economic development and homogeneity slows it down," (Florida 2011). This evidence is sufficient because people that are from different cultures, ethinic groups, and racial groups have brought new ideas to countries which helps economies grow. Diversity can also help propel entreprenuership and improves productivity. The Atlantic Cities has a strong history of reviewing and examining economics.
Because of targets, people of genocide will otften flee and see refuge in other places and countries for safety, and this causes a political burden on other countries. It is relevant because of the fact that it is a political downside to genocide for any country. It is effective because for it to politically burden other countries shows that it is a negative result of genocide. There are citizens going to other countries to get away from the genocide and demand action be taken on the country they came from because they would have family members getting murdered and that are still stuck there. Groups like the United Nations were formed to reduce the burden of having of any one nation having to defend a group of people alone and to make an effort to prevent genocide. It helps find a solution to the people who ar outraged, and prevents getting other countries the tough decision of letting the genocide continue to happen or to risk their own people alone to make it stop. These political burdens in other countries exist because of genocide, and that is another negative affect of genocide that influences more than just the country it is...

Find Another Essay On The Causes and Consequences of Genocide

The Causes and Consequences of the French and Indian War

647 words - 3 pages From One War to AnotherThe French and Indian war, a war that had assembled the largest number of troops ever, was caused by more than a hundred years of rivalry between the two countries, had several consequences on the British Empire, and impacted the colonies greatly. When the fire of the French and Indian war was blown out, another match was dropped, starting another war.The main causes of the French and Indian war also known as the Seven

What were the causes and consequences of the Mexican War?

642 words - 3 pages , and to offer the U.S. government's assumption of liability for the claims of U.S. citizens in return for boundary adjustments. When Mexico declined to negotiate, the United States prepared to take by force what it could not achieve by diplomacy. The war between the United States and Mexico had two basic causes, Manifest destiny and the U.S. annexation of Texas, which led to further conflict between the North and the South and indirectly caused the

The Causes And Consequences Of The General Strike In 1926

1340 words - 5 pages The Causes And Consequences Of The General Strike In 1926 For a brief period after the First World War, Britain faced an economic boom. Workers were in a strong position and businesses were optimistic, believing that world demand for British goods would increase and trading would return to the success it had prior to the war. However, in 1920, Britain experienced their worst economic slump in history. This was caused by

The Causes an Consequences of Crime and Punishment

2058 words - 9 pages this is what happens to the main character of the book, Raskolnikov. He is given many chances to do the right thing and not sin, yet the devil still provides even more temptations, and gets Raskolnikov to fall into the trap of murder. Yet God does still give you chances for forgiveness and wants you to reject your sin. The devil works in any way he can to get men to sin, but God will send a way to get you to forgive your sins and come back to him

Factors Leading to Genocide and Consequences of It

2829 words - 11 pages Factors Leading to Genocide and Consequences of It The Cambodian genocide of 1975-1979, during the Democratic Kampuchea (DK) regime headed by Pol Pot, is considered to be one of the worst human tragedies of the 20th century. In comparison with other genocides that have happened in other countries, this one brought together extremist ideology with ethnic hostility and also a terrible indifference for human life. Khmer

Causes of Brain Trauma and their Consequences

1624 words - 7 pages YEAR : 2 LECTURER’S COMMENTS: ………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Question: (A) Explain the causes of brain trauma and their consequences. According to Gregory (2001) the brain is defined as the control centre for the most complex organ of the human body. Traumatic brain injury is defined as a result of the application of either

Causes and Consequences of Marital Breakdown

884 words - 4 pages Helga Kissová, 3ESANThe Causes and Consequences of Marital BreakdownMarriage is a complex interpersonal relationship. Among the reasons for marriage are emotional, financial, spiritual, and religious ones. In some religions marriage is considered to be a sacred bond between a man and a woman and to break it up is viewed as a blasphemous act. However, nowadays divorce is becoming an everyday process and people do not even blink if a

Causes and Consequences of Alcohol Prohibition

1570 words - 6 pages structure of American policy making, especially liquor policies. Throughout US history, states have regulated alcohol consumption in many different ways such as liquor licensing, local options, excise taxation, distribution and finally, statutory prohibition. Indeed, according to Shrad (2007), the prohibition causes lie within american policy experimenting just as nine other North American and European countries did. (Schrad, 2007) Consequences

Causes and Consequences of Operation Barbarossa

2296 words - 9 pages Causes and Consequences of Operation Barbarossa On June 22nd 1941, German forces crossed the Russian frontier and began to fight their way into Soviet territory. Operation Barbarossa, Hitler's codename for the attack on Russia, had begun. In this essay I am going to describe the causes, events and consequences of Operation Barbarossa. What happened when the 'unbeatable' Hitler and Germany met the sheer determination and

Causes And Consequences Of WWII 1935-1945

1280 words - 5 pages Darren Le.Thu, 20th March 2014.Causes And Consequences Of WWII 1935-1945A, Why was Germany so successful in the European War up to the start of Operation Barbarossa?There are many reasons for Germany's early successful in the European War up to the start of Operation Barbarossa. For one good thing, their army was bigger and another one has the most modern military in the world in 1939. While most of European were still using biplane, and tank

Causes and Consequences to the Irish Recession

1401 words - 6 pages construction sector and poor regulation were the major contributors in the Irish recession. A fiscal crisis erupted, NAMA (National Assets Management Agency) was established to secure bad loans in banks, and a EU/IMF bailout was agreed which burdened Irish taxpayers. I will explore the causes and consequences of the crisis in this essay. ‘The Celtic Tiger’ was the term used by Irish people to describe the rapid growth Ireland was witnessing

Similar Essays

Causes And Consequences Of The Reformation

1039 words - 4 pages Causes and Consequences of the ReformationThere were several causes of the Reformation. Some of them were short-term causes and others were long-term causes. One of the long-term causes of the Reformation was that many people thought that the Church was not following the Bible. For example, many people were unhappy with the idea of indulgences. Indulgences were gifts that people gave to the Church so their sins would be forgiven. In 1517 Luther

The Causes And Consequences Of Global Warming

859 words - 3 pages hurricanes, and melting of ice-burgs have been increasing. Many scientists have agreed that that global warming is in fact still occurring as we speak. In the article "Global Warming: Confronting the Realities of Climate Change” it states that the signs are clear. The earth’s temperature has increased over the years. It has been shown and proven that global warming is still in effect because the consequences of this problem are still increasing

The Causes And Consequences Of Elder Abuse

1755 words - 7 pages This essay will begin by giving a definition of elder abuse and it will then go on to briefly explain elder abuse. It will then move on to discuss the causes and consequences of elder abuse. It will then outline the ways in which policy and practice has responded to the problem of elder abuse since the protection of our future: Report of the working group on elder abuse was published in 2002. It will then conclude by evaluating these responses

The Causes And Consequences Of Metabolic Inflexibility

1272 words - 5 pages cycle (Koves et al., 2008). Despite disagreeing on the precise cause of insulin resistance, all of the published research agrees on one central theme: it is imperative to remain metabolically flexible in order to avoid the numerous, and potentially disastrous, consequences associated with metabolic inflexibility. As previously described, metabolic inflexibility is the inability to appropriately switch back and forth between fuels depending on their