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The Character Of Heathcliff In Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte

993 words - 4 pages

The Character of Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

What do we learn about Heathcliff’s character from Pg 12 - the
entrance of Heathcliff (paragraph 2) to Pg 13 “my amiable lady”.

How typical is this of elsewhere in the novel?

This extract is taken from the beginning of the novel, chapter 2. In
this chapter we begin to pick up on the uncomfortable atmosphere in
Wuthering Heights and a further insight into the characters and their
relationships.

Heathcliff’s entrance on page 12 causes a plea of shelter from Mr.
Lockwood. He says “You see sir, I have come according to my
promise!”. This emphasises Heathcliff’s status of power in the WH and
the constant need to please and treat him with respect. This
exclamatory sentence shows us Mr. Lockwood naivety to the situation in
WH, more emphasise is provided for this characteristic in Mr
.Lockwood’s inability to understand the danger of the moors, which in
turn leads the reader to believe that he may not understand the danger
of Heathcliff.

This extract intrigues readers through the desire to understand
Heathcilff. His obvious rudeness to assist in Mr. Lockwood’s safe
journey to his abode shows us how much he has changed since refusing
to leave Catherine in the care of the Linton’s at Thushcross Grange in
chapter 6, “I refused to go without Cathy” (pg 51). This unbelievable
contrast between the young Heathcliff and the master we are introduced
to is Emily Bronte’s method to draw us in to the inner consciousness
of his character through this obvious inner conflict we are being
presented with. His body language is deeply described throughout the
novel which not only represents his mood, “shaking the white flakes
from his clothes” (chapter 2, pg 12), as he talks to Mr Lockwood
suggests that his patience to hold a conversations has disintegrated
along with his caring nature he once had, and has no sympathy for Mr
Lockwood’s now, impossible journey home. Similarly in Chapter 8 where
a young Heathcliff is delighted to witness “Hindley degrading himself”
and began to become “savage” and full of “sullenness, ferocity”, it
appears Heathcliff takes pleasure in watching others suffering like in
Mr Lockwood now.

This chapter also links to the lexis used to describe Heatchliff’s
reply to young Cathy concerning the tea. His commanding “Get it
ready, will you?”, was “uttered so savagely” and also...

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