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The Chronicles Of Narnia By C.S. Lewis

716 words - 3 pages

The voyage that the children take is entirely synonymous with the voyage that Lewis took in order to discover his Christianity. Lewis utilizes the different characters in the novel in order to show his different challenges and opinions that helped lead him to Christ and identify again with the Christian faith.
In the beginning the children were all back in England at their aunt and uncles house when suddenly the waves in the picture on the wall began to move. Quicker than ever, the water sprang from the painting and devoured the children with it back into Narnia. Appearing on the Dawn Treader with their old friend King Caspian. The king’s quest on the boat was to find the lost kings, that are old friends of his father’s.
Not only did the four children travel to Narnia, but their cousin was also transported to the far away land with them. Eustace took a more negative attitude towards the “adventure” and wished to be home. The boy was one to complain often about the lack of food and water and his distaste with overall experience. During a part of their journey, after Eustace was caught attempting to steal water, he thought it was best to stray away from the group in order to avoid staying on the ship any longer. While away, he comes upon a dragon near death. After the dragon had died Eustace took one of its gold pieces from the cave it lived and put it on his wrist. Waking up only to find that he himself had turned into a dragon. Panicking and feeling horrible that he had become such an awful creature he seeks the help of the people he originally left behind. Just as Lewis denounced God at a young age, Eustace leaving his family and straying away shows the struggles Lewis faced when becoming an atheist. Eustace’s inability to communicate and receive help from the others explains how Lewis struggled with confusion on how to move forward with his religion. Lewis purposely made Eustace unable to speak with the others to signify how he had to come to the...

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