The Chronicles Of Narnia: The Magician's Nephew By C.S. Lewis

1184 words - 5 pages

From famous children’s novels rise famous villains, the name of whom almost everyone knows, and anyone could tell you their story, their evil deeds, and the name of the hero who was ultimately clever enough to lead them to their downfall. C.S. Lewis’ Narnia series is no exception, and although it is home for countless different villains, one seems to rise above the rest, and her name is mentioned in whispers throughout the entire series after her appearance in the first book. The White Queen is first spoken of in the first book of the series, The Magician’s Nephew when lost adventurers Polly and Diggory find her in her home world of Charn, where she is known as Jadis. She ultimately follows them into Narnia, where she begins to establish her reputation in the supposed thousand years between the first book and the second. In the most famous of the Narnia books, The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, the White Queen is the most vile of all beings ever known in Narnia, she has cast the ‘Hundred-Year Winter’ over Narnia, and she is known for her manipulative presence, and her ability to turn living beings to stone. In the first two books of the series, Jadis, the White Queen, consistently uses her powers of her stature and fear along with manipulation to coerce and frighten the beings over which she rules; these tactics earn her the reputation of villainy.
The first book of the Narnia series is The Magician’s Nephew, the book functions as a sort of prologue to the other books, giving context for some of the most famous characters and also how Narnia itself was created. At the start of the book, two young children, Polly and Digory become friends through being neighbors with each other. Digory has just recently moved into the house he now shares with his Uncle, who is a mysterious professor, keeping to his study upstairs. Through a series of events, Polly and Digory get transported to a mysterious place they nickname ‘The Wood Between Worlds’, a small forest full of pools, each leading to a different world. The first pool they jump into leads them to Charn, a dead world at first sight, but it is there they meet “…Jadis the Queen of Queens, and the Terror of Charn” (Lewis, 93). She is tremendously tall, and exceedingly beautiful, and uses her stature to her advantage immediately, coercing Polly and Digory into taking her to The Wood Between Worlds.
She continues to use her stature as a weapon and a valuable item throughout the remainder of The Magician’s Nephew, and into the second book in the series, The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. Another major part of her reputation is built around the fear that beings hold for her physique and her strength. Strength enough to “break [an] arm with one twist” (Lewis, 61).
The only other tactic she uses that is as strong as her is her ability to instill fear into every being in Charn, the Human World, and Narnia. Her most powerful weapon of all may be, her unlikely ability to use fear as a weapon itself....

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