The Chrysalids Essay

826 words - 3 pages

The Chrysalids Essay by Kelvin Wirmantio - How doe fear affect the social interactions in The Chrysalids?Throughout the Chrysalids, the society presented is greatly shaped by the oppressive nature of its people alongside their religious beliefs. The combination of the two creates a society where both fear and religion are the forces at play that govern the society. John Wyndham, author of The Chrysalids, depicts a society that tries to a perfect by all means necessary; even if the means are seen as unethical from an unbiased point of view. Such forces at play heavily influences the many relationships presented in the novel, relationships between a parent and child, husband and wife and among certain races presented in the society serving only as some of the many examples.The standards and regulations of the society presented in The Chrysalids clearly revolves around the religious foundation it was built on and this also creates the extremist point of views and means its people are willing to exercise to protect their society; an example would be its non-deviational standard. Deviations are organisms that do not pertain physically to their race, and unfortunately, the people of Waknuk aren't particularly fond of them. While offences, non-human deviations, are burnt to eradicate any possibility of reproduction, blasphemies, human deviations, are banished into the Fringes. Having this standard in place causes problems for the social interactions with the people in The Chrysalids, such as the relationship between a parent and child. As stated, Parents in the Chrysalids have very poor judgment and would very much prefer to prioritize in keeping to these standards much rather than caring for their child. Acting in such a manner eradicates any emotional attachment and trust between a parent and child, since deviational children in The Chrysalids feel secluded from their parents, hurt that they cannot even seek help from them, given their merciless nature, like the relationship between Joseph and David Strorm. Parents in the Chrysalids also have to send off their children to the Fringes or be prudent to send off their children if they grow to become deviants. This either eradicates any form of communication since birth, as with Gordon and Elias Strorm, or it distances the two since they both would fear of separation and the emotional trauma afterwards if they were to bond.The relationships affected by this force aren't only between the parents and...

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