This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The City Of Ephesus In Biblical Times

2792 words - 11 pages

The City of Ephesus in Biblical TimesThe city of Ephesus was known as ?The Gateway of Asia? a very large Metropolislocated in Asia Minor. The people were cultural and unique in the ways they lived in theirsociety. The City itself was very cosmopolitan. They had libraries, museums and Temples for one of the goddesses they worshipped named, ?Artemis Ephesia?, or ?Diana?. This city was full of cultic practices, such as; palm reading, wizards, sorcerers and black magic. This type of pagan worship was prevalent during the time of Apostle Paul?s arrival there. It appears that Paul had much to contend with since hristianity was definitely counter-culture to the people of this great city.One wonders what was the city of Ephesus like, or how might it have looked? Where the building might have been located? What were the people like? What exactly was the atmospherein and around Ephesus? Well when glancing at the City of Ephesus it may be assumed that the people were ignorant, superstitious and unsophisticated. This is not a correct assumption, judging from the city?s beautiful libraries, temples, market center, Trajan Fountain, hillside houses and magnificent theater.?The Library of Celsus built in a.d 135 by Julius Aguila in memory of his father, Celsus, who was a Roman senator and governor-general of the province of Asia. Here thousands of parchments and papyri were stored, protected from dampness and worms by a double wall. Estimates of the number of rolls that could be stored in the library vary from 9,500 to 12,000. Celsus was a lover of books and was given the honor of being buried, not only within the city, but in the vault of his own library among his books. On the first floor of its façade there stood four female statues representing wisdom, fortune, knowledge, and virtue.?(www.padfield.com/2000/ephesus.html)The Apostle Paul?s first visit to Ephesus is mentioned in the book of Acts 18:19-21.?And he came to Ephesus and left them there: but he himself entered into the synagogue, and reasoned with the Jews.When they desired him to tarry longer time with them, he consented not;But bade them farewell, saying I must by all means keep this feast that cometh in Jerusalem: but I will return again unto you, if God will. And he sailed from Ephesus.?(The Holy Bible, KJV)When he first entered into the city he went to minister to the Jews there instead of the gentiles. He did not contend with the gentiles; they did not hear the gospel at this time. They were left with their goddess, Artemus, which the Romans called (Diana) to worship. This ancient city had a distinctive way in which they viewed their society. The people did not like change nor new ideas from others. Especially if those views disagreed with their own system ofbelief. They were a people who wanted to worship whatever and whenever it pleased them, and to whatever god was in vogue. This was a very clannish society.?All Greeks were bound to respect each other?s cities sanctuaries and cults if...

Find Another Essay On The City of Ephesus in Biblical Times

Biblical Character in the Life of Barnabas

2806 words - 11 pages .” (Deut. 10:9) “The believers were unified not only spiritually (one in heart and mind) but also materially. Their selling of their goods was voluntary and the distribution was according to need.” Barnabas may have been a man of considerable financial means, as he did own land. Biblical character is apparent in him as he makes the arduous journey to Cyprus, completes the task of selling the land, and travels back to Jerusalem to place the

Biblical Allusions in Lord of the Flies

726 words - 3 pages Biblical Allusions in Lord of the Flies In the story, Lord of the Flies, there are many biblical allusions; Simon represents Jesus, the pig’s head represents Satan or rather their satanic sides, Jack represents Judas, and the island represents the Garden of Eden. Through out this novel these allusions play large parts in the story and ideals place in the story. Simon, one of the major characters in the story, is set as the allusion of

Biblical Allusions In Tess Of The D’Ubervilles

1186 words - 5 pages acts and convictions of both Tess and Angel, illustrate their apparent link to the life of Adam and Eve. Lastly, Alec D'Uberville, the antagonist of the novel, exemplifies the malicious ways of the serpent who causes all wrongdoing in Eden. Although, this concept is repeated throughout numerous works, it has a very deep effect on the story. The numerous biblical allusions within the novel, paired with the clear and observable imagery, proves Thomas Hardy made assiduous attempts to relate his novel, Tess of the D'Ubervilles to the important history of Adam and Eve.Works Cited Hardy, Thomas. Tess of the D'Urbervilles. New York: Signet Classic, 1964.

Biblical Themes in "Lord of the Flies"

756 words - 3 pages 34). This quote shows a direct reference to a biblical location, yet another link between Lord of the Flies and the Bible. Furthermore, Golding describes the island as being an Eden, unspoiled and sustaining, much as the Garden of Eden we find in the Bible. Thus through diction Golding’s connection to western literature is confirmed.In the ways of diction and characterization Golding’s Lord of the Flies is very similar to western

Biblical Allusions and Imagery in Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath"

1669 words - 7 pages artistic level and they still consider it a beautifully mastered work of art. More than any other American novel, it successfully-1-2embodies a contemporary social problem of national scope in an artistically viable expression.1 In The Grapes of Wrath, Steinbeck utilizes Biblical imagery and allusions to illustrate the struggle of the Joad family as a direct parallel with that of the Hebrew people.Steinbeck bolsters the strength of structure and

The Biblical Allusion of Lot's Wife in Slaughterhouse-Five

2050 words - 8 pages to do after World War II and, in doing so, fails to recognize their own faults. Rumfoord epitomizes this attitude when he tells Billy, a survivor of the Dresden firebombing, that the bombing of Dresden “had to be done” (253). The diction of ‘had’ and the emphasis placed on it indicates an attitude that America’s obliged to destroy the unarmed, civilian city. Furthermore, ‘done’ has a double meaning in the sentence. The word ‘done’ means both

BIBLICAL AND MYTHOLOGICAL REFERENCES IN THE WIFE OF BATH’S PROLOGUE

1962 words - 8 pages metaphors are based on the Old and New Testaments of the Bible. Among the group of pilgrims, the Wife of Bath or Alisoun is the most interesting character. She uses the Biblical references so that she can question the validity, intent, or interpretation of the Bible.Alisoun thinks of herself as a pious person and attends church regularly in her parish. She gives to charity and is dutiful; however, she has her opinions on how things should be in

BIBLICAL AND MYTHOLOGICAL REFERENCES IN THE WIFE OF BATH’S PROLOGUE

1951 words - 8 pages metaphors are based on the Old and New Testaments of the Bible. Among the group of pilgrims, the Wife of Bath or Alisoun is the most interesting character. She uses the Biblical references so that she can question the validity, intent, or interpretation of the Bible.Alisoun thinks of herself as a pious person and attends church regularly in her parish. She gives to charity and is dutiful; however, she has her opinions on how things should be in

The Biblical History of Judaism

948 words - 4 pages . The Israelites had escaped. A tradition practiced today comes from the three patriarchs of Judaism. Followers are supposed to pray three times a day with each patriarch being giving a particular time. Blech states, “Jews to this day recite the morning prayer of Abraham, the afternoon prayer of Isaac, and the night time service of Jacob” (Blech 291). This tradition reaffirms the importance of biblical history in the everyday life of today’s Jewish adherents.

The Canon of Biblical Writings

3226 words - 13 pages The Canon of Biblical Writings For centuries now Christians have claimed to possess the special revelation of an omnipotent, loving Deity who is sovereign over all of His creation. This special revelation is in written form and is what has come to be known as The Bible which consists of two books. The first book is the Hebrew Scriptures, written by prophets in a time that was before Christ, and the second book is the New Testament

Biblical Theology of The Exodus

1359 words - 5 pages stopped the army from crossing as well, with the walls of water engulfing them. (Ex. 14:26) God’s redemption isn’t limited to this single event. God sent plagues to save his people from bondage (Ex. 7:14-11:9), parted the sea for them to cross (Ex. 14:1–31; Josh. 3:1–17), then continues to provide food and water during their journey in the desert. (Ex.15:22–17:7) “On some occasions they become instruments of judgment, at other times, of blessing

Similar Essays

An Analyisis Of "The Widow Of Ephesus"

862 words - 4 pages “True love is like ghosts, which everyone talks about and few have seen,” Francois de la Rochefoucauld once said. As part of his novel Satyricon, the short story “The Widow of Ephesus” was written by Petronius. The story revolves around a woman who is so devoted to her husband that she has become famous for her fidelity. So famous in fact that women from neighboring villages and towns come just to see her. One day, her husband dies and she

The Temple Of Artemis At Ephesus

789 words - 4 pages There have been many Ancient Greek temples that have been discovered. Most of these sanctuaries are magnificent stone or marble structures. Structures that leave people in awe and make them want to be transported back to when this building was built. One of these many temples is the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus. There were many reasons as to why this amazing building was built, why it is famous, and why it affected so many people in Ancient

Use Of Satire And Irony In The Widow Of Ephesus And The Poem True Love

545 words - 2 pages Use of Satire and Irony in The Widow of Ephesus by Gaius Petronius and the poem “True Love” by Judith Viorst In the story The Widow of Ephesus by Gaius Petronius and the poem “True Love” by Judith Viorst, the authors portray love through the use of satire and irony. They do this though a series of ironic twists, humorous accounts, and life experiences. A satire is a literary work holding up human vices and follies to ridicule

Biblical Imagery In The Story Of Rapunzel

2037 words - 8 pages fulfilled, behold, there were twins in her womb” (Genesis 25:21, 24). The very tower in which Rapunzel is imprisoned is an image from the Bible. This tower is symbolic of the tower of Babel, “…a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven…,” built in Babylonia in biblical times (Genesis 11:4). As such, the tower is a symbol linking heaven and earth. In some biblical passages, in fact, the image of a tower actually represents God and godliness in