This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Civil Rights Movement: The Promise Of Justice

913 words - 4 pages

The era of the civil Rights movement was the time in America which blacks and other minorities started getting more independence and more equal rights. This movement required several brave leaders and many life changing events in order for America to become the integrated nation that it is today. A lot of protests and boycotts took place they were usually non-violent, which the minorities discovered work best throughout this period in time schools, public places and other everyday places slowly but surely became integrated.
One of the first major events that happened was the Brown vs. Board of Education case. Oliver Brown who was an African American had a daughter. The school she attended was far from her house, and in order for her to get there she had to go through an unruly neighborhood. She stated that the neighborhood was uncomfortable to walk through. There was a school right across from her house but since the rule was “Separate but equal is constitutional” she couldn’t attend it because it was a white school. Her father complained and the case was taken to the Supreme Court. The ruling of Plessey vs. Ferguson was overturned and the equal isn’t equal.” After this most schools became integrated.
This event was impacted by the Brown vs. Education case. The town of Little Rock Arkansas was one of the most clean, pretty, and quiet cities of the United States in the late fifties. All citizens that had lived there took an abundant amount of pride in their town for its aesthetic atmosphere and peaceful cleanliness. Previous to the events that changed the lives of nine students, as well as, the race relations in America; Little Rock was a town where there was very little tension. “Negroes and whites, for many years had lived side by side with little surface friction.” Little Rock could have continued to be the town where black and white individuals, families, and children could live separately without tension and violence. The city of Little Rock will never be the same. Segregation in public schools officially became outlawed. Brown v. Board of Education proclaimed that “in the field of public education the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place.” Central High school will become desegregated and start to admit African American students. On September 3, 1957, the nine chosen students were about to make history (Ernest Greene, Elizabeth Eckford, Jefferson Thomas, Terrence Roberts, Carlotta Walls Lanier, Minnijean Brown Trickey, Gloria Ray Karlmark, Thelma Mothershed-Wair, and Melba Pattillo Beals). They did not know what to expect. Melba Beals expressed her shakiness in her venting diary, “Dear Diary, It’s happening today. What I’m...

Find Another Essay On The Civil Rights Movement: The Promise of justice

The Civil Rights Movement Essay

2088 words - 8 pages Man-made constitutions once created a society based on hierarchy, separating black from white, Latino from Asian, and rich from poor. Through the significant decades of the 1940s-1960s, America laid the groundwork for civil rights, a movement through which minorities fought for equal opportunity. How could America call itself “land of the free” when only the white man could socially and economically move upward? For minorities, this

The Civil Rights Movement Essay

3343 words - 14 pages During the 1950s and 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement took place. Black citizens of America were all part of a large, organized struggle for justice and equality. The burden of racism became too much to bear and black Americans, tired of waiting for change, joined forces to protest. It is often acknowledged that the nation that was built on the principles of liberty and democracy was the nation that denied certain people their right to those

The Civil Rights Movement

982 words - 4 pages The Civil Rights Movement The 13th amendment, passed on the first of January, 1865 abolished slavery throughout America. Although African Americans were considered free after this amendment was passed, they still had a long and arduous struggle to absolute freedom. Before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, segregation in the United States was commonly practiced throughout many of the Southern and Border States. Schools, bathrooms, libraries, and even

The Civil Rights Movement

977 words - 4 pages The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution form what is known as the Bill of Rights. In essence it is a summary of the basic rights held by all U.S. citizens. However, Negro citizens during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950-70’s felt this document and its mandate that guaranteed the civil rights and civil liberties of all people; were interpreted differently for people of color. The freedoms outlined in the Constitution were

The civil rights movement

626 words - 3 pages . Martin Luther King, Jr., who led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States of America.In January, 1957, a meeting of southern black ministers was held in Atlanta, tosee what could be done to continue the baffle against racism and segregation. From thismeeting, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was formed, for thepurpose of expanding non-violent means to end segregation. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was elected as the SCLC's first

The Civil Rights Movement

1705 words - 7 pages The Civil Rights Movement “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” This was a speech by Martin Luther King Jr. Even one hundred years after slavery was banned, African Americans were still being treated unfairly. Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the most famous leaders of the Civil Rights movement in the 1960’s

The Civil Rights Movement - 1662 words

1662 words - 7 pages The Civil Rights Movement The 13th amendment, passed on the first of January, 1865 abolished slavery throughout America. Although African Americans were considered free after this amendment was approved, they still had a long and arduous struggle to absolute freedom. Before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, segregation in the United States was frequently used throughout many of the Southern and Border States. Schools, bathrooms, libraries, and even

The Civil Rights Movement - 4513 words

4513 words - 18 pages Segregation and The Civil Rights Movement Segregation was an attempt by white Southerners to separate the races in every sphere of life and to achieve supremacy over blacks. Segregation was often called the Jim Crow system, after a minstrel show character from the 1830s who was an old, crippled, black slave who embodied negative stereotypes of blacks. Segregation became common in Southern states following the end of Reconstruction in 1877

The Civil Rights Movement

882 words - 4 pages The 1960’s were a time of freedom, deliverance, developing and molding for African-American people all over the United States. The Civil Rights Movement consisted of black people in the south fighting for equal rights. Although, years earlier by law Africans were considered free from slavery but that wasn’t enough they wanted to be treated equal as well. Many black people were fed up with the segregation laws such as giving up their seats on a

The Civil Rights Movement - 1535 words

1535 words - 6 pages Many changes occurred during the late 1950s into the early 1960s in the goals, strategies, and support of the movement for African American civil rights. Many strides were made for racial equality in the United States. However, while changes were made, they did take a considerable amount of time to achieve. This made some leaders of the civil rights movement frustrated and caused them to divert from their original goal of

The Civil Rights Movement - 1642 words

1642 words - 7 pages . This movement was put in place to put a dent in the cities financial policies. As significance, all African-Americans pulled together and stopped using the city buses; as well as, car pulling and walking. (Appleby 824) With the victory of the Montgomery Boycott, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. became a leader of the civil rights movement (Appleby 825). He was a leader that chose to use nonviolent retaliations; such as Mohandas Gandhi, his influencer

Similar Essays

The Civil Rights Movement Essay

1810 words - 7 pages The latter part of the Civil Rights Movement was characterized by action and change as it was no longer centralized in the South or only fought for by black individuals. Rather, northerners were active in achieving black equality and the white community was campaigning for integration. Although many lost their lives in this struggle, their valiancy did not go unrewarded and soon enough African Americans were able to vote, work, study

The Civil Rights Movement Essay 2482 Words

2482 words - 10 pages structure maintains control of society in ways that are less apparent than they were thirty years ago, but retain a similarly powerful grip. To combat racism today, the struggle for civil rights must explore new methods that illuminate racial discrimination and distinction more clearly. Continuing to fight for social justice is the only way equality can one-day become a reality. Historically, Black groups and leaders have advocated many

The Civil Rights Movement Essay 1313 Words

1313 words - 5 pages The civil rights movement in the middle of the 20th century marked an important point in the changing of race relations in the United States. Prior to and during the civil rights movement, African-Americans faced legally sanctioned persecution and Jim Crow justice at the hands of white Americans. Peaceful protests and other methods of civil disobedience were often met with aggression and violence from whites. Although legally having the right

The Civil Rights Movement Essay 1706 Words

1706 words - 7 pages they would name this park ‘White Park’” the young boy thought to himself. When he asked his parents as to why it was not named green, brown, blue, or yellow park, but instead “White Park” they did not want to explain to their young child the ongoing issue of segregation that was going on in their present day world (Watson). The Civil Rights Movement was a movement to fight for the end of segregation between blacks and whites and additionally