The Civil Rights Movement And Bombingham

1475 words - 6 pages

One Bomb, Four Lives, Many Changes
In the year 1963, many events took place in this year from blacks boycotting Boston buses to the assassination of JFK. However, that is not what is going to be elaborated on in this essay. It is going to be about the 16th Street Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama (Simkin). There are a lot of things a reader may not know, unless that reader is a historian or has looked up this topic before. In 1963 a local black church was about to have their 11:00 a.m. service on Sunday, September 15 (Trueman). In the women’s room of the church are four African American girls, Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14), which were getting ready for the service while also talking about their first day of school (Simkin), until their whole world would be changed and they wouldn’t know it.
The city of Birmingham was also known as “Bombingham” because all of the bombings that had gone on in the year 1963. The good thing was no one was hurt in the bombings. All of the targets that were hit were owned by African Americans. The bombers targeted black homes, black businesses, black churches and even black schools. All of these targets were supposed to cripple the will of the black people instead it just strengthened their movement. The main place that people would conduct their civil rights activities was the 16th street Baptist Church (Trueman).
The 16th street Baptist Church was the largest black church in Birmingham, Alabama (Simkin). It hosted some of the most historic figures during all of the Civil Rights movement such as Thurgood Marshall, W.E.B. DuBois, and later Hillary Clinton would be there as well as junior senator from Illinois and future president Barack Obama (Simkin). The church was located in the downtown area of Birmingham where a lot of the civil rights campaigning took place. Many civil-rights activists held huge meetings, sponsored rallies and planned demonstrations to fight against segregation (Trueman).
Then, within the blink of an eye there was an explosion that killed those four little girls and injured many others (Staff). The men suspected to be responsible for this devastation were named Robert “Dynamite Bob” Chambliss, Bobby Frank Cherry, Herman Frank Cash and Thomas E. Blanton Jr. (Simkin) . Then, J. Edgar Hoover was told by an eye witness that they had seen Robert Chambliss fleeing the scene (Trueman).
Robert Chambliss was born January 14, 1904. He was a member of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). He also had some good buddies that could get him dynamite. So based on this information Hoover thought he could have Chambliss locked up by the end of the week, this proved to be more of a challenge then he had anticipated considering where the trial was being held, in one of the more racial prejudice cities in the United States (Simkin). With that being said the whole trial was rigged with an entire jury being all white supremacy activists and only three black jurors...

Find Another Essay On The Civil Rights Movement and Bombingham

The Civil Rights Movement Essay

2482 words - 10 pages civil rights movement of 1960s adopted platforms that were similar to those that were created by their predecessors. Nonviolent groups advocated passive resistance, which was similar to Washington?s approach because both worked within the system. Black power groups agreed with Du Bois in that they felt Blacks could assert control over their own destiny. Groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and Martin Luther

The civil rights movement Essay

626 words - 3 pages . Martin Luther King, Jr., who led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States of America.In January, 1957, a meeting of southern black ministers was held in Atlanta, tosee what could be done to continue the baffle against racism and segregation. From thismeeting, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was formed, for thepurpose of expanding non-violent means to end segregation. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was elected as the SCLC's first

The Civil Rights Movement

1705 words - 7 pages . The Civil Rights movement was a movement of African Americans who felt that they were not being treated equally. There were also many other famous leaders and inspirations during the Civil Rights Movement. This movement was very important to the freedom of African Americans. An influential leader of the Civil Rights Movement was Rosa Parks. Rosa parks was born on February 14, 1913. She was born as Rosa Louise McCauley to James McCauley, a

The Civil Rights Movement

1662 words - 7 pages The Civil Rights Movement The 13th amendment, passed on the first of January, 1865 abolished slavery throughout America. Although African Americans were considered free after this amendment was approved, they still had a long and arduous struggle to absolute freedom. Before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, segregation in the United States was frequently used throughout many of the Southern and Border States. Schools, bathrooms, libraries, and even

The Civil Rights Movement

2088 words - 8 pages Man-made constitutions once created a society based on hierarchy, separating black from white, Latino from Asian, and rich from poor. Through the significant decades of the 1940s-1960s, America laid the groundwork for civil rights, a movement through which minorities fought for equal opportunity. How could America call itself “land of the free” when only the white man could socially and economically move upward? For minorities, this

The Civil Rights Movement

882 words - 4 pages The 1960’s were a time of freedom, deliverance, developing and molding for African-American people all over the United States. The Civil Rights Movement consisted of black people in the south fighting for equal rights. Although, years earlier by law Africans were considered free from slavery but that wasn’t enough they wanted to be treated equal as well. Many black people were fed up with the segregation laws such as giving up their seats on a

The Civil Rights Movement

1313 words - 5 pages The civil rights movement in the middle of the 20th century marked an important point in the changing of race relations in the United States. Prior to and during the civil rights movement, African-Americans faced legally sanctioned persecution and Jim Crow justice at the hands of white Americans. Peaceful protests and other methods of civil disobedience were often met with aggression and violence from whites. Although legally having the right

The Civil Rights Movement

1535 words - 6 pages Many changes occurred during the late 1950s into the early 1960s in the goals, strategies, and support of the movement for African American civil rights. Many strides were made for racial equality in the United States. However, while changes were made, they did take a considerable amount of time to achieve. This made some leaders of the civil rights movement frustrated and caused them to divert from their original goal of

The Civil Rights Movement - 3343 words

3343 words - 14 pages During the 1950s and 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement took place. Black citizens of America were all part of a large, organized struggle for justice and equality. The burden of racism became too much to bear and black Americans, tired of waiting for change, joined forces to protest. It is often acknowledged that the nation that was built on the principles of liberty and democracy was the nation that denied certain people their right to those

The Civil Rights Movement - 1642 words

1642 words - 7 pages . This movement was put in place to put a dent in the cities financial policies. As significance, all African-Americans pulled together and stopped using the city buses; as well as, car pulling and walking. (Appleby 824) With the victory of the Montgomery Boycott, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. became a leader of the civil rights movement (Appleby 825). He was a leader that chose to use nonviolent retaliations; such as Mohandas Gandhi, his influencer

The Civil Rights Movement - 1486 words

1486 words - 6 pages CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENTSEGREGATIONWhites in the South were determined to control the South as they had always controlled the South. Although the reconstruction finally ended in the South, laws know as the Jim Crow laws went into effect. These laws were put into effect to keep African Americans from getting jobs and just getting the same rights that other white people received in the South. The Jim Crow laws were a system of legal separation or

Similar Essays

The Civil Rights Movement Essay 1706 Words

1706 words - 7 pages they would name this park ‘White Park’” the young boy thought to himself. When he asked his parents as to why it was not named green, brown, blue, or yellow park, but instead “White Park” they did not want to explain to their young child the ongoing issue of segregation that was going on in their present day world (Watson). The Civil Rights Movement was a movement to fight for the end of segregation between blacks and whites and additionally

The Civil Rights Movement Essay 1810 Words

1810 words - 7 pages The latter part of the Civil Rights Movement was characterized by action and change as it was no longer centralized in the South or only fought for by black individuals. Rather, northerners were active in achieving black equality and the white community was campaigning for integration. Although many lost their lives in this struggle, their valiancy did not go unrewarded and soon enough African Americans were able to vote, work, study

The Civil Rights Movement Essay 982 Words

982 words - 4 pages The Civil Rights Movement The 13th amendment, passed on the first of January, 1865 abolished slavery throughout America. Although African Americans were considered free after this amendment was passed, they still had a long and arduous struggle to absolute freedom. Before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, segregation in the United States was commonly practiced throughout many of the Southern and Border States. Schools, bathrooms, libraries, and even

The Civil Rights Movement Essay 977 Words

977 words - 4 pages The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution form what is known as the Bill of Rights. In essence it is a summary of the basic rights held by all U.S. citizens. However, Negro citizens during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950-70’s felt this document and its mandate that guaranteed the civil rights and civil liberties of all people; were interpreted differently for people of color. The freedoms outlined in the Constitution were