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The Civil Rights Movement In The 1960’s

584 words - 2 pages

Fighting for Civil Rights during the 60's

The struggle began with non-violent protests. Backed by students, the civil rights movement trudged onward. African Americans staged mass protests to show their support. Despite all this, many racial barriers still remained in the South. Black objectives were redefined in the 60's when militant black consciousness developed. The great society emerged providing hope for all. Liberal optimism swept the nation and liberalism influenced internationally. The latter part of the 60's was characterized by discontent.
Jim Crow laws made African Americans second class citizens, but they fought against segregation using passive resistance. During World War II black activism originated, followed by the Supreme Court reversing the Plessy v. Ferguson trial. This led Martin Luther King, one of the great civil rights leaders, to emphasize the need for voting rights.
Black students organized sit-ins to protest segregation. Using that as an example, student activists formed their own civil rights organization and focused more closely on local issues. African Americans helped president Kennedy win the election of 1960. Freedom riders sought to deplete segregation of the upper hand in the Deep South.
African Americans had built up momentum and were staging mass protests. The leaders of these protests focused their efforts on Birmingham. In awe at the numbers gathered during the March on Washington, the public supported the civil rights law. The civil rights act eliminated "whites only" public facilities.
In spite of the civil rights act, many racial barriers remained in the south. Civil rights leaders played a big role in Mississippi. They encouraged voter registration and recruited white volunteers. King concentrated on the voting rights...

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