The Color Imagery In "The Lighthouse" By Virginia Woolf.

554 words - 2 pages

How boring this world would be without colors. Colors not only make life more vibrant, but they can also be linked to characteristics and emotions. In Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse, color is frequently used to enhance the imagery and to better represent the characters and the overall setting.Woolf uses each color to further implant imagery in the reader's mind. She uses the color grey to represent the elderly and sleepiness when she wrote, "When she looked in the glass and saw her hair grey, her cheek sunk, at fifty," and also when she wrote, "...as he was in a grey-green somnolence which embraced them all..."When she introduces Mr. Carmichael who is surrounded by loneliness, Woolf describes his cat's yellow eyes. The color yellow represents loneliness and depression. Another use of the color yellow was when Woolf describes his mustache; "vivid streak of canary-yellow in moustache and bear that were other milk white." The milk white in his mustache is cocaine, a drug that can be used by depressed lonely people in order to escape their pain.Woolf then continues to use color imagery by beginning to describe a painting which is an advertisement for a circus; "brush revealed fresh legs, hoops, horses, glistening reds and blues..." Each color in her description is full of life and this can be observed by the use of the adjective 'glistening' to describe them. The color blue represents determination and the color red represents honor.At the end of the story, she brings all of the colors together in order to form a reality of what life is; a mixture of emotions and characteristics. Woolf does this...

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