The Color Legacy In Major Leage Baseball

1447 words - 6 pages

Before 1947, Major League Baseball had never had a black player, although there were Negro Leagues. Jackie Robinson broke that. It takes courage and dedication to chase after something you love. Jackie had that for the game of baseball. The Civil Rights Movement was occurring during the time Jackie enter the Major Leagues, so the times were tough for him. Jackie did more than just play baseball; he introduced a whole new way to play the game, with blacks and whites. He did this by breaking the color barrier and introducing blacks into the Major Leagues, facing discrimination and showing his true passion for the game, and showing that he was looking to help all African-Americans in the civil rights movement.
Breaking the color barrier takes a lot of courage, so someone had to do it. Jackie was born in Cairo, Georgia on January 31, 1919 (The Phillip Lief Group Inc). His dad left him when he was only just a baby. While growing up, Jackie and his four siblings were alone with just their mother. Jackie’s mother, Mallie, packed up the family and moved them out to Pasadena, California. The family was faced with cruel and harsh discrimination there too. Mallie worked as a maid to support her children, and they remained poor, but Jackie introduced himself as a high school athlete at John Muir High School. (The Biography Website) After graduation, Jackie attended Junior College, where he excelled in football, baseball, basketball, and track. Jackie’s older brother, Matthew, inspired Jackie to follow his love and passion for sports. Matthew one a silver medal in the 200 meter dash at the 1936 Olympic games. In 1939 Robinson entered the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), where he became the first student ever to earn letters in four different sports (York). He was an astonishing running back there and was named the “greatest ball carrier” in the game of football by Sporting News. Playing basketball, he led the Pacific Coast Conference in scoring for 2 years straight. Robinson won the National Collegiate Athletic Association broad jump title in 1940. He won swimming championships while at UCLA, and also reached semifinals of the national African American tennis tournament. According to (The Biography Website), despite his athletic success, Robinson was forced to leave UCLA just shy of graduation due to financial hardship. Jackie then moved to Honolulu, Hawaii to continuing playing sports.
When Jackie arrived in Honolulu, he went right to work. He started playing for a semi-professional football team, the Honolulu Bears; however, his season ended early because of the attack on Pearl Harbor and World WarII began. Jackie was drafted into the war in 1942 (The Biography Website). He served as a second lieutenant in the U.S Army. According to biography.com, Jackie never even saw any combat when he was stationed, but he was arrested in 1944 at boot camp for not giving up his seat on a bus and moving to the back. Jackie was honorably discharged and...

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