This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Conditions Of Women During The Victorian Era In England. Used In A Class Presentation In 2nd Year Of Philology.

542 words - 2 pages

We chose Act 3 for our presentation because it reflects women's lifestyle during the Victorian Era. Women of the mid- 19th century had no choices. Most lived in a state little better than slavery. They had little choice but to obey men, because in most cases men held all the resources and women had no means of subsistence. A wealthy widow or spinster was a lucky exception. A woman announcing her intention to remain single would attract social disapproval and pity.In that time it was thought that women who didn't marry early in life, might not be able to marry at all. Suitable places to meet a potential husband were Functions such as Church Social or a Holiday Dance and glamorous balls. Age difference was really not important then. Someone her own age, or even younger, was perfectly acceptable for a young woman, but so was a husband substantially older than her. What parents and ladies looked for in a man was a solid character, an established position in society, and a comfortable income. However, some fear of remaining single led women to marry unwisely. It is remarkable that once a woman married, everything the couple owned became of the husband and he kept everything in case of divorce.It was expected that girls would marry and have children, so it was generally considered wasteful to spend money on their education. Since "a woman's place was in the home", most young girls were taught mainly the skills needed for domestic lives as wives and mothers. Middle-class girls received a basic education usually given at home by a governess. She taught them Reading, Writing...

Find Another Essay On The conditions of women during the Victorian Era in England. Used in a class presentation in 2nd year of Philology.

Women and the Poor in Victorian England in Jane Eyre

2105 words - 8 pages How does Bronte explore the position of women and the poor in Victorian England throughout her novel Jane Eyre? Jane Eyre was Charlotte Bronte’s first successful novel. Published in 1847, Bronte presents us with critique of Victorian assumptions regarding social class and gender. Way ahead of its time, Charlotte Bronte (or publicly none as Currer Bell), caused much commotion critically. In her novel Bronte explores many issues of

Hard Times Depiction of the Position of Young Women in Victorian England Society

1249 words - 5 pages The advancements made in Victorian England socially, politically and technologically resulted in the questioning of how to grow and keep up with the times while still maintaining the core traditions that the Victorians idealised. One of the main debates in Victorian England was the discussion around the proper place and characteristics of women. Writers during the time period incorporated their personal opinions and outlooks on where women

Women and Men of the Victorian Era

1772 words - 7 pages . Other female students and she gained an education at this institution where they were taught general education courses, foreign languages, and even to play musical instruments. This autobiographical work was monumental in female advancement during the Victorian era. From male perspectives women were only needed to take care of a household and were certainly not intended to intellectually progress on the level as any man. Women were withheld

New Women of the Victorian Era

1445 words - 6 pages By: Teddy Ruxpin 13MAY98 “New Women” of the Victorian Era The Victorian era brought about many changes throughout Great Britain. Man was searching for new avenues of enlightenment. The quest for knowledge and understanding became an acceptable practice throughout much of the scientific community. It was becoming accepted, and in many ways expected, for people to search for knowledge. Philosophy, the search for truth, was becoming a more

Writings of Robert Browning During the Victorian Era

1369 words - 6 pages during this time had a lot to do with social improvement (Everett). Although Robert Browning was technically a “Victoria poet” he did not go along with the “typical Victorian style” that everyone from this time period was used to, Robert Browning had a very different style that included violence and many different dramatic verses (faculty.unlv.edu). In 1812 on May 7th, Robert Browning was born (The comp. Poetical works of Browning) . He was

Discrimination of Women During the Elizabethan Era

1221 words - 5 pages Throughout the Elizabethan era, men had more advantages than women. William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew has characters such as Petruchio, Baptista, Katherine, and Bianca that show how men overpowered women. During the Elizabethan era, there was heavy sexism. Women were discriminated. Through Shakespeare’s language, men could speak to and about women in a disrespectful and derogatory manner. Women were voiceless and deprived of

The Sex during the Victorian Era

731 words - 3 pages The Victorian era brought about many changes and the introduction of new things. One issue that stood out was “The Sex.” Many things evolved around this issue like changes in laws all over, it became a topic for literary poets/ writers and also for the woman question. This term means discrimination based on a person’s sex and during the 19th century this was a vast issue toward women. This all Started from the early Victorian era with queen

Women's Rights during the Victorian Era

1438 words - 6 pages Women’s Rights during the Victorian Era The Victorian era, spurred a momentary sequence of both women and men in search of a prosperous relationship regulated by the demanding etiquettes of the Victorian Society. If these desired qualities were not in possession, a man or woman could be labeled as ‘unsuitable’ in the positions of a husband or a wife. Women suffered mostly throughout the Victorian Era as rights were ceased and the rules and

British women during the victorian age and in "Sense and Sensibility" by Jane Austen

3145 words - 13 pages This essay deals with the status of upper- and upper middle class British women from the Victorian era to the twenty-first century. I will look at how women came to be equal with men and what the steps leading to equality were. However, the main focus of the essay will be on how women are treated in Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen, how it reflects its time and how you can see the conditions as a backdrop for the fictional story. I will look

Making Sense of Culture - A 2nd Year Visual Literacy Oral Presentation

671 words - 3 pages central feature of Marxist theory is the 'materialist' stance that social being determines consciousness. According to this stance, ideological positions are a function of class positions, and the dominant ideology in society is the ideology of its dominant class. This is in contrast to the 'idealist' stance that grants priority to consciousness.Marxists differ with regard to this issue: some interpret the relationship between social being and

The Threat of Women During the Jacobean Era

1989 words - 8 pages Why were women looked so far down upon by men within the revenge tragedies discussed in class? Was this simply a theme or was this reality? During the Renaissance Era men looked at women as if they were threats. Men were very dominant in society and women did not hold any political positions, unless they were royal. However even a royal woman did not have much to say next to a man. Women’s good looks and sexuality made men feel threatened and

Similar Essays

Societal Views Of Women In The Victorian Era In Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House

898 words - 4 pages Societal Views of Women in the Victorian Era in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen, creates a peephole into the lives of a family in the Victorian Era. The play portrays a female viewpoint in a male-dominated society. The values of the society are described using the actions of a woman, Nora, who rebels against the injustices inflicted upon her gender. Women’s equality with men was not recognized by society in the

Victorian Era Gender Roles And The Development Of Women’s Football In England

1270 words - 5 pages football this way became a focal point for issues and debates in Victorian society regarding, feminine ideology, gender inequality, rigid class structure, and social devotion to the past. The dominance of the upper-class elite in Victorian England ensured the propagation of traditional gender roles and hegemonic masculinity in British culture. In addition the middle-class established higher social standing, gained wealth and began to enjoy leisure

Effects Of Industrialization And The Conditions Of The Working Class In England

1347 words - 5 pages Effects of Industrialization and the Conditions of the Working Class in England In the middle of the 19th century the industrial revolution was flourishing in England. With all of the advancements in machinery there would be new opportunities and drawbacks for citizens. Many would leave their lives on the farms and work in factories with unsafe settings. Karl Marx felt that the new advancements in society were able to support

Working Women In The Victorian Middle Class

612 words - 2 pages Working Women in the Victorian Middle-Class Charles Dickens’ character Miss Abbey Potterson is “some sixty and odd” years old, obviously unmarried (Miss), and a business owner (she owns a bar). Despite the fact that Victorian middle-class women were supposed to aspire to idleness, a growing number of women were becoming employed in the 19 th century for a number of reasons. The growing number of “redundant” (unmarried, like Miss Potterson