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The Dark World Of George Orwell's 1984

1673 words - 7 pages

Use it or lose it. As is true with any muscle, the mind must be kept strong and alert or else, like the other muscles, it will atrophy. But unlike the other muscles which preserve a man’s direct survival, it is the mind that a man uses to preserve his liberty. As the saying goes, “You must know where you came from to know where you’re going.” This exercise of the mind in history ensures man’s ability to avoid mistakes, eschew wrongdoings, and defeat tyranny. Similarly, through the use of vocabulary, a man can verbalize, analyze and clearly understand those virtues and emotions that have guided history, and thus he may discover things worth living and dying for. But a people restrained by Newspeak-like vocabulary and apathetic political ignorance, like those of George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, will be duped by their government into doublethink, and will thus be powerless against revisions of history, and eventually, the punishment of citizens for Thought-crimes.
Clearly, some of the most critical characters to the United States agreed that government ought to exist manifestly as a body made of the people, to protect the power of the people. President Lincoln stated in the Gettysburg Address, the government of the United States should be composed “...by the people, of the people, and for the people...” (Lincoln). It is the citizens, not the demagogues who, for the sake of preserving liberty and protecting the best interests of the people, should be the ones to have the say in political affairs. The separatist Pilgrims to the New World in 1620 agreed that government should be an institution run by the people in order to better serve those people when they decided to “... covenant, and combine ourselves together into a civill body politick; for ye our better ordering, and preservation and further therance of ye ends aforesaid…” (Mayflower Compact). The writers of the Constitution expressed that rights of the people ought not to be encroached upon by government when they penned the words “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people” (U.S. Constitution). Thomas Jefferson declared that governments are institutions created for the preservation of the people, not the other way around, when he boldly said:
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect...

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