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The Consequences Of Biological Warfare Essay

1021 words - 5 pages

In today’s society, numerous people have heard the term biological warfare being used more often. However, not everyone is well aware of how dangerous it really is. Biological warfare is executed in wars to kill a lot of people using deadly weapons such as: chemicals, biological agents, and radioactive toxins. Some people commonly mistake biological weapons with other weapons of mass destruction like nuclear, and chemical weapons. Although, there are a few differences between biological warfare and other hazardous weapons, people still need to realize how dangerous biological weapons are and how they can impact an individual’s life.
Biological warfare is one of the unique ways of creating ...view middle of the document...

What really stands bio weapons out from the rest is that it’s silent, but deadly. For example, once the weapon is exposed to the population, it doesn’t take affect to the people right away, it slowly develops and then causes people to have health problems. In addition, there are various choices on which toxins and other harmful chemicals can be used against the society. An alternative way of obtaining such toxins is by creating them. With the help of advanced biotechnology, it has become much easier to manufacture certain viruses based on their DNA. “Thus, one of the first indicators of a BW attack could be a disease outbreak. The effect of BWs, disease, can continue after its release. If a transmissible agent, such as the smallpox or Ebola virus, infects a person at the site of its release, that person could travel and spread the agent to others” (Stebbins, 2007). By having one person on the site of where the attacked happened, that person could potentially cause an epidemic crisis if not treated quickly. Therefore, people should understand how seriously dangerous biological warfare is.
Another way of noticing biological warfare is by observing the most feared agents. Some of the most feared agents include smallpox, anthrax, and Ebola virus. These particular viruses and bacteria are considered to be the most dangerous of them all. In an article titled, “How Biological and Chemical Warfare Works”, by Marshall Brian and Susan L. Nasr, it states that smallpox is one of the most feared because there are various forms of it and if untreated right away the vaccinations will be useless and the individual will die. “It has been eradicated worldwide, but the fear is that terrorists could release new strains. The main problem with smallpox, unlike with anthrax, is that it is highly contagious. It spreads and kills very quickly. Up to 40 percent of people who catch the virus die from it in about two weeks, and there is no good treatment for the disease”. Thus, one should be cautious about the symptoms of smallpox and should immediately receive medical attention. Anthrax is another agent that is...

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