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The Constitution Of The United States

771 words - 3 pages

The Constitution of the United States was written in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention, where it was held in Philadelphia. It was written by a group of people known as “Farmers,” or the “Founding Fathers,” and few of the most famous Founding Fathers were George Washington (The first president of the USA), Thomas Jefferson (The first vice president and the third president of the USA) James Madison (The fourth president of the USA), Samuel Adams, and Benjamin Franklin. The old government, the Articles of Confederation was not working as it supposed to be, it was vulnerable and cannot secure and defend the new born nation and for that reason the constitution of the united states saw the light.

The Constitution is the highest law in the United States, All others laws come form the constitution in a way, it explains the fundamental structure of the government and how different branches of the government interact with each other, showing each branch verges. However, in order for us to clearly understand the United States Constitution, which might seems ambiguous for a lot of people, we have to be familiar with the three different branches of the government, which are the legislative, the executive and the judicial. Each one of these branches is described in the first three articles of the constitution. The Founding Fathers of the constitution didn’t want for one man to have all the authority and for that reason this separation was made. Yet, those three branches complete each other. In other word, each one of them has it is own responsibilities but still linked to the other branches of the government.


Established by Article I of the Constitution, the legislative branch is made up of the two houses of Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives. Which there job is basically to create law and declare war. The Senate consists of 100 senators, two from each state; each senator is elected by his state and serves six years. The Senate needs to ratify all laws by a two-third vote. The vice president who is the head of the Senate is not permitted to vote, but in case of a tie he is allowed to. The House of Representatives is made of 435 representatives, each is elected by his state and serve two years. The...

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