The Contribution Of The Kushan Empire To Buddhism

2357 words - 9 pages

The material world constantly changes according to the natural law of impermanent. History had shown that while one civilization perished, another develops. However, for some disappeared civilization, vast information remained intact, while other buried in ruins or even no trace is left behind. It is essential to note that without past there would not be possible for current and future. Therefore, history is very important.
According to David Hume:
History is not only a valuable part of knowledge, but opens the door to many other parts, and affords materials to most of the sciences. And indeed, if we consider the shortness of human life, and our limited knowledge, even of what passes in our own time, we must be sensible that we should be forever children in understanding, were it not for this invention, which extends our experience to all past ages, and to the most distant nations; making them contribute as much to our improvement in wisdom, as if they had actually lain under our observation. A man acquainted with history may, in some respect, be said to have lived from the beginning of the world, and to have been making continual additions to his stock of knowledge in every century.
Knowledge of historical civilization indeed is very important. Fortunately, with the help of today’s magic—modern science, we can go back even further into history than we had before. New technology has allowed archeologist to unearth many mysterious artifacts that could change the world history or at least make a contribution to the history of the world. These artifacts added more evidential facts to valuable information that has been left out for thousands of years. The profits found in history can be pin-pointed as of three categories: it amuses the one that interest, enhances our understanding, and heightens our virtue. In as much as to say, making visible data of the history would benefit current lives and future generation.
This paper investigates a historical phenomenon surrounding the Kushan Empire and their contribution to Buddhism. 1) Sketching the migration of the Yuezhi -Kushans and how their empire was formed. 2) Outline the contribution of King Kanishka made to Buddhism. All materials are based on western scholarship. In turns, looking at this particular history not only bring forth profitable part of knowledge, but the open door to vast areas and yield many significant materials that are beneficial.
Part 2: The Kushan Empire and Buddhism
a) Kanishka and the fourth Council in Kashmir
According to Buddhist wisdom, Kanishka was a cruel and impious person, who later turns to Buddhism through the marvelous teachings of the Buddha. Like Asoka, he regretted his misdeed and took refuge in the Triple Gems (Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha). Further, become a patronage of Buddhism.
Kanishka the great started his reign in 78 CE and ruled for 23 years till 101 CE or 102 CE, under the influence of Buddhism. In Warraich words, “During the reign of Kanishka Gandhāra...

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