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The Cosmological Argument Is Self Contradictory Essay

1160 words - 5 pages

The Cosmological Argument, also known as the First Cause Argument, is
one of the most important arguments for the existence of God, not only
because it is one of the more convincing, but also because it is one
of the most used. The thought that everything that happens must have a
cause and that the first cause of everything must have been God, is
widespread. The cosmological argument is the argument from the
existence of the world or universe to the existence of a being that
brought it into and keeps it in existence. The idea that the universe
has an infinite past, stretching back in time into infinity is both
philosophically and scientifically problematic. All indications are
that there is a point in time at which the universe began to exist.
This beginning was either caused or uncaused. The cosmological
argument takes the suggestion that the beginning of the universe was
uncaused to be impossible. The idea of an uncaused event is absurd;
nothing comes from nothing. The universe was therefore caused by
something outside it. The cosmological argument thus confirms one
element of Christianity, the doctrine of Creation.

The Cosmological Argument
-------------------------

(1) Everything that exists has a cause of its existence.
(2) The universe exists.
Therefore:
(3) The universe has a cause of its existence.
(4) If the universe has a cause of its existence, then that cause is
God.
Therefore:
(5) God exists.

This argument is subject to a simple objection, which arises in the
form of the question "Does God have a cause of his existence?"

Now the whole universe is a vast, interlocking chain of things that
come into existence. Each of these things must therefore have a cause.
Ie: My parents caused me, and my grandparents caused them, etcetera.
But it is not that simple. I would not be here without billions of
causes, from the Big Bang through the cooling of the galaxies and the
evolution of the protein molecule to the marriages of my ancestors.
The universe is a vast and complex chain of causes. But does the
universe as a whole have a cause? Is there a first cause, an uncaused
cause, and a transcendent cause of the whole chain of causes? If so,
then there is an eternal, necessary, independent, self-explanatory
being with nothing above it, before it, or supporting it. It would
have to explain itself as well as everything else, for if it needed
something else as its explanation, its reason, its cause, then it
would not be the first and uncaused cause. Such a being would have to
be God, of course. If we can prove there is such a first cause, we
will have proved there is a God. If, on the one hand, God were thought
to have a cause of his existence, then positing the existence of God
in order to explain the existence of the universe wouldn't get us
anywhere....

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