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Analysis Of The Documentary The Crucible Of Europe

1865 words - 8 pages

The documentary starts by explaining that by the 9th century North Africa and Spain were in the hands of Muslim rulers. Under Muslim rule in Toledo, Spain were Jews who flourished in the area. The Jews followed the conquest of Islam through North Africa and Spain. On the continent of Europe the three Abrahamic religions met. The Jewish people would transform Europe and be transformed themselves. Alhambra of Granada, the Moorish palace in Southern Spain was described as beautiful with pleasure gardens and trees of all kinds. The Muslim and Jewish people were brought together for their love of art, knowledge, music, poetry, and philosophy. This era is known as the Golden Age.
Spain was in the hand of Moorish rulers and with this they paved the way for Jewish followers. In Spain the Muslim and Jewish people stood together to create a new culture similar to the Roman Empire. The Arab cultural foundation was a combination of many other cultures. Some of the cultures which influenced the Arab renaissance were Greek, Indian, and Jewish. In delicate patterns the words found in the Quran were carved on walls in palaces and mosques. It was seen everywhere the combination of faith and beauty. The Arabs left a profound legacy for all time. They immersed themselves in mathematics and sciences, with the creation of Algebra. They read the works of classical Greek and explored the parts and by ways of philosophy. They tolerated and accepted other people.
By the 9th century most Jews lived in Arab lands. The Arab culture influenced the Jews which led to their sharing in the large part of the community; this ideal was largely accepted in the Muslim lands of Spain. In the early 10th century Abdurrahman III established the independent caliphate of Spain, in the Mosque of Cordoba. This welcomed many Arab poets and philosophers as well as scientist. The Jewish linguist and statesman Hasdia ibn Shaprut served in the court of Abdurrahman which led to his creation of his own Jewish court, which became the center of Jewish culture. A new world of Judaism would be born in Spain the land of Sephardim. They would play an important part in the government, statecraft, and scholarship of Moorish Spain. In Granada the Sephardim would take many important positions in the Moorish government. The Jews took inspiration from Arab literature and revitalized their ancient texts which were previously only used for worship. Hebrew was reborn in worship and song.
The Golden Age of Muslim Spain would come to an end as the separate areas went to war. Even as it came to an end its remarkable vitality would find great expression. The first three centuries of the Golden Age are seen in the works of Maimonides the greatest Jewish Scholar of his time. Maimonides was forced to flee Spain’s turmoil and fled to Egypt where he worked as a mathematician and physician. He was appointed to attend the Sultan Salah al Den, since he was the best physician of his century. Maimonides writes to a...

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