The Cuban Revolution Essay

779 words - 3 pages

The time of the Cuban Revolution was a great deal of turmoil, not just in Cuba but in almost every corner of the world. It was 1945, shortly after the end of World War Two, and the Cold War was taking off between the United States and the Soviet Union. Cuba, in the middle of its own war, was caught up in the international politics of the Cold War. The interaction between international and domestic politics played a major role in the outcome of the revolution. The result of the revolution left Fidel Castro in charge of Cuba.
The Platt Amendment states that the United States has the ability to interfere at various points in Cuba’s history. This gave America the ability to better serve its own interests in the region, including sugar production, which prevented Cuba from expanding its economy by any important means. Problems arose when Flugencio Batista had intents and purposes to throw out the Constitution of 1940. The problem for the United States was that with that constitution went the rights and guarantees given to them in the Platt Amendment. However, the lack of the United States intervention allowed Fidel to take power in 1958.
Fidel Castro’s biggest blow to Batista’s government, outside of actually overthrowing him, was the attack on the Moncada Barracks on July 26, 1953. This event gave birth to the July 26th Movement. The plan was to attack the barracks and seize the weapons there, which would then be distributed to the general public who would then revolt(the cuban revolution p 53). The plan failed, and the government tortured and killed many of the participants, most of whom were young men. These actions were appalling to the nation, and it seriously harmed the government’s public image.
Victory for the revolution came on New Year’s Eve, 1958. Batista fled the country in fear for his life and the rebels gained control of the nation. Their focus was national sovereignty, reform, economic growth, a redistribution of wealth, and social justice(the cuban revolution p 62). Finally, in 1965, Cuba officially became communist with the emergence of the Cuban Communist Party, with Fidel Castro as their leader.
Castro’s involvement with the foreign and domestic politics during the early Cold War period greatly influenced the outcome of the Cuban Revolution. Without the actions taken...

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