The Cultural Imperatives Of Psychologists Essay

1561 words - 6 pages

Most inhabitants of the Space Coast do not consider “snow birds”, people that live somewhere else and come to the beach when their home becomes too cold, as residents. I have always wondered what makes members of a group, such as Space Coast residents, disconnect themselves from outsiders. Even psychologists use cultural imperatives to keep unwanted or unqualified people out of the psychological community. The research in the psychological field covers a vast array of disciplines and takes a post-graduate education. Psychologists use cultural imperatives to vet the psychological community and outline the manner in which new research becomes knowledge. I will begin by discussing the origin of psychology and psychology’s growth over time.
The practice of researching human behavior, which dates back to most ancient civilizations, has become better understood and more effective over time. This research led to modern psychology and has become increasingly broad since the first notion that one person could observe and measure the reasoning behind another person’s actions. Researchers in the field can study psychology as a whole or one of the various sub-disciplines that psychology breaks down into. These sub-disciplines range from the psychology of learning to fringe theoretical psychology. The men and women who conduct studies in the psychological field, referred to as psychologists, continue research in their sub-disciplines to add to the knowledge of the community. Psychologists focus on the study of the mind while clinicians treat individuals that suffer from psychological disorders. Now that I have covered psychology’s growth, I will move on to the ways that psychology currently impacts the world.
The psychological community tends to receive the progression of science into the field in various different ways. In the article “The Next Big Questions in Psychology,” David Funder discusses the ways research can evolve from historical practices. Perhaps that way of looking at the established guidelines for psychological research prompted some clinicians to question the integrity of new research. In an October 2009 publication of Newsweek Magazine, Sharon Begley points out an apparent bias toward the old practices that may not work as well as new treatments backed by scientific research. In the article “Hugo Münsterberg's Attack on the Application of Scientific Psychology,” Ludy Benjamin illustrates that the argument between psychological researchers and clinicians dates back to the study’s beginning. While some psychologists attempt to hang on to the past, others have begun to look into the possible applications of new theories.
In “Applying the Psychology of Science to the Science of Psychology,” Dean Simonton provides examples of ways modern science, when applied to psychology, can change ancient findings. Simonton, in “Evolutionary Psychology: Controversies, Questions, Prospects, and Limitations,” seems to believe that the research ideas in...

Find Another Essay On The Cultural Imperatives of Psychologists

Exploring How Psychologists Study the Role of Play in Child Development

3324 words - 13 pages Exploring How Psychologists Study the Role of Play in Child Development Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, New Edition, 1995 defines “play” as: “[Children] when children play, they do things that they enjoy, often together or with toys.” Play is one of the most powerful vehicles children have for trying out and mastering new social skills, concepts and experiences. Psychologists, such as Faulkner (1995

The Phenomenon of Cultural Globalization Essay

921 words - 4 pages just a passing trend, but also rather a worldwide phenomenon that has replaced the Cold War system. Concerning "cultural globalization," the two main dimensions that make up this social state are media and communications, as well as religious responses, such as the ideology of fundamentalism. This specific literary work will concentrate on the significant dimension of the media. The media is acknowledged as one of the most influential

The Myths of Cultural Globalization

3841 words - 15 pages Two powerful scenarios dominate the public discourse about the cultural consequences of globalization. The one very common scenario represents globalization as cultural homogenization (for example Benjamin Barbers McWorld vs. Jihad). In this scenario the culturally distinct societies of the world are being overrun by

The Cultural Significance of Extraterrestrials.

536 words - 2 pages "The Cultural Significance of Extraterrestrials"Have you ever wondered why so many people seem caught up in the idea of extraterrestrials? However it began, something uncanny is going on inside of Americans' imaginations. At least that is the message one gets when contemplating the continued fascination with movies like Men in Black, Mars Attacks!, Independence Day, and Star Wars. Entertainments featuring extraterrestrials are not just

The Dimensions of Cultural Context

1356 words - 5 pages The Dimensions of Cultural Context “The cultural context in which human communication occurs is perhaps the most defining influence on human interaction. Culture provides the overall framework in which humans learn to organize their thoughts, emotions, and behaviors in relation to their environment” (1). By going through the five dimensions of the cultural context of Brazil, a lot is revealed about the interesting culture, and gives a

The Cultural Analysis of Memento

1504 words - 7 pages Memento is an odd but successful film, and it is also an outstanding and influential cultural work. As an unusual crime film, it uses unconventional non-linear narrative structure to tell a story that a man with a unique type of amnesia investigate his wife’s murder. However, if we watch carefully, we would find Memento involves the real social cultural background. Memento was released in 2000 when was the beginning to enter the 21st century

Cultural Revolution Of The 1920s

744 words - 3 pages The 1920's were times of cultural revolution. The times were changing in many different ways. Whenever the times change, there is a clash between the "old" and the "new" generations. The 1920's were no exception. In Dayton, Tennessee, 1925, a high school biology teacher was arrested. He was arrested because he taught the theory of evolution. The teacher, John T. Scopes, was accused of having violated the Butler Act. This

The Cultural and Sub Cultural Influence of Narcotics Anonymous

886 words - 4 pages The Cultural And Sub Cultural Influence of Narcotics Anonymous. The Subculture of N.A is a life outside of any expectations formed by the main Cultural Influence. It is a very private organization that I belong to which became a way of life for me. It has values, traditions, beliefs, sanctions and roles. This is the only outside influence in my life that made me develop meaning to my life again. I was a complete and total crack addict who

Scientists, Psychologists and the Media do not have enough evidence to support the claim of the relationship between criminal activity or criminal behaviour and video games.

1989 words - 8 pages Thesis Statement: Scientists, Psychologists and the Media do not have enough evidence to support the claim of the relationship between criminal activity or criminal behaviour and video games.The public debate regarding the relationship between video games and violence has brewed for decades. The emergence of video games, dramatically changed children's media environment, and this new form of entertainment raised concern because the negative

Judges and jurists have great faith in the accuracy of eyewitness testimony. Psychologists, however, would have us believe eyewitnesses have little to offer the Criminal Justice System. Discuss.

2488 words - 10 pages innocent people are wrongfully convicted every year (Buckhout, 1974), and as a study by Brandon & Davies (1973) found, 74% of wrongful convictions resulted from evidence provided by eyewitnesses. Such findings have led many psychologists and legal scholars to claim that eyewitness testimonies should be used with great caution, if at all. Houts (1956), for example, stated, "Eyewitness identification is the most unreliable form of evidence and

What exactly is cultural relativism in metaethics? Is cultural relativism true? Can cultural relativists uphold the principle of cultural tolerance?

2125 words - 9 pages Metaethics is a branch of ethics that explores normative ethical questions concerning what it means be 'good'; the existence of objective and absolute values; the source of our values; and the nature of our moral judgments. Cultural relativism is a theory within the domains of metaethics which attempts to answer these questions, but in doing so raises its own problematic questions, such as whether or not we can be culturally tolerant and not

Similar Essays

Constitutional Imperatives Of The Inclusive And Accessible Workplace In India

2173 words - 9 pages explore the constitutional perspectives and imperatives of such inclusive and accessible workplace based on the provisions of the Constitution of India. Constitutional Concept of Inclusive and Accessible Workplace: The Constitution of India does not have any specific provision outlining the concept of inclusive and accessible workplace. This is not to say the Constitution of India in anyway negates the idea of inclusive and accessible

Psychologists: The New Generation Of Scientists

882 words - 4 pages New Generation Scientists? “Psychologists study mental processes and human behavior by observing, interpreting, and recording how people and other animals relate to one another and the environment.”(U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics) Psychologists devote their time to helping others whether its in a well known firm or a local school. In their work, psychologist have four goals. Psychologists are one of the best paid careers in industry but it

How Do Psychologists Interpret The Role Of Genes In Behaviour?

1191 words - 5 pages There have been many debates in the field of psychology wether we behave the way we do due to nature or nurture. This controversy has many sides to it. Most of the time it can be concluded that they collaborate. But how do behavioural psychologists and geneticist actually find evidence that the genes play any role in our behaviour at all? Psychologist always try to find out what leads a person to a certain behaviour. On the nature side of view

Discuss Some Of The Ethical Problems Faced By Psychologists When Involved In Psychological Investigations.

1520 words - 6 pages distinguish between the 'good' and the 'bad' in human conduct. Or "that which is deemed acceptable in human behaviour in pursuit of certain aims or goals" (British Psychological Society guidelines 1978).Obviously one would think that psychologists should focus on the 'good', however it seems that concern has been growing throughout the years that this is not always the case.In the UK the British Psychological Society (1985, 1990) have a code of