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The Debate Over Airport Security Essay

1280 words - 5 pages

Airport security
Does the thought of going through airport security make you want to jump off a bridge? Some people may think that security in airports is either too strict, or it is not enforced enough. Airport security has certainly developed over time, both in terms of more technology, and in terms of increased security. It has had a lot of reasons to step up, both with terrorist attacks, and with other incidents, such as the way that explosive technology has evolved. The topic of airport security is a big debate: is it too strict or not strict enough? It is important that people know and understand both sides of this important issue.
There are many reasons why people believe that airport security should be more enforced. One reason is because of historical events. There are attacks that date all the way back to the 1930s. For example, there was an attack over Chesterton, Indiana killing all seven people that were aboard the small airplane. In 1949, a man from Canada named Albert Guay set a dynamite bomb in his wife’s luggage before she boarded the DC- 3 aircraft. Everyone on the plane was killed in the explosion. Later, him and his two accomplices that were involved in the making and the transporting of the bomb were arrested, and then they were executed. In 1970, President Nixon passed a law that said every person that gets on a plane, and their luggage, have to be screened before they board. Additionally in 1972, the FAA or the Federal Aviation Administration, made it mandatory that the airliner companies scan every passenger with a metal detector to try to prevent hidden weapons. On Christmas day of 2009, a man named Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, a 23 year old from Nigeria, attempted to set off explosives aboard a Northwest Airlines flight en route to Amsterdam, and then Detroit, Michigan. He had concealed explosives in his underwear, and because the were plastic, they went through the security without drawing any attention (Gale Opposing Viewpoints).
The people who oversee security are part of the FAA. The FAA have many responsibilities besides airport security. They have responsibilities such as the maintenance and the operation of all of the security equipment. They secure aircrafts and airports, and the actual airways themselves. All of this together forms one of the most technologically advanced jobs and organizations. The FAA's goal as a whole is to keep things as safe as possible. Gale Group.
That the FAA uses equipment to aid in security. Scanners and screening devices are some of the most important aspects of airport security. In March of 2010, the airport security administration came out with a new type of scanner that uses magnetic waves instead of x-rays. This was demonstrated by TSA agents themselves. They showed this in the Chicago International Airport. The O’Hare airport is the second airport to receive one of these 150 scanners. Gale Database.
Besides terrorist attacks, smuggling is one of the many reasons that...

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