The Decay Of Tribal Culture In South Africa Is Analyzed Partially Using The Novel "Cry, The Beloved Country" By Alan Paton

1854 words - 7 pages

A Culture Clash at its Worst

South Africa's history is marked by social turmoil and racial injustice. Harboring tremendous diversity, South Africa fought, and still fights, towards the creation of a single nation of unity and common purpose. The tribal culture predominant in the early 1900s began slipping

away as industrialization swept through the country and power shifted into the hands of whites. The black population's tribal lifestyle was slipping away with the times, yet they were not accepted in the cities and rather were plunged into a state of limbo. The whites feared the power that the predominant black population would gain if they were to become skilled and adopt western culture, and they therefore instilled restrictive laws as a defense. This increased repression was accompanied by increased resistance, and the racial divisiveness gained strength.

From 1920 to the 1970s, South Africa reeled, not under racism per se, but under the battle between the emerging western and decaying tribal cultures brought on by the lure of industrial cities and the white's fear of a loss of power.

The urbanization and industrialization of the 1930s exposed blacks to a western economy and way of life, thus contributing to the decay of tribal culture. "Mass migration occurred as both black and white South Africans moved from rural areas to urban settings" which bared job

opportunities and industry (Worter 57). Grand cities, such as Johannesburg, emerged from what used to be rural mining grounds. Large groups of Africans and Europeans came together in the confined urban spaces of the mine, the factory, the shop, and the home, and in response to these

proximity problems housing crises and tension emerged. The large-scale housing crisis that broke out caused blacks to be pushed into confined areas of the cities known as squatter's camps and Shantytowns (Meyer 27). In these inadequate homes people suffered from poverty, malnutrition,

and lack of appropriate shelter from the rain and cold (Meyer 27). The blacks in this environment, rich with western economy and culture, began to loose touch with the already passing tribal lifestyle. The government attempted- quite unsuccessfully- to reverse the black migration to cities through increased restrictions and repression. The Group Areas Act, established in 1950, formed residential and business sections in urban areas for each race and the

Industrial Conciliation Act allowed the government to reserve skilled jobs for whites only (About). Influx control laws were also implemented allowing no black without residential qualifications to remain in an urban area for more than seventy-two hours (Hirsch). Despite all

the government's efforts, they failed in keeping the blacks out of the cities because the incoming western culture overpowered the traditional culture allowing the blacks to...

Find Another Essay On The Decay of tribal culture in South Africa is analyzed partially using the novel "Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton

Biblical Allusion in Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton

1096 words - 4 pages The use of Biblical allusions and references is evident in Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country. Against the backdrop of South Africa's racial and cultural problems, massive enforced segregation, similarly enforced economic inequality, Alan Paton uses these references as way to preserve his faith for the struggling country. By incorporating Biblical references into his novel, one can see that Alan Paton is a religious man and feels that faith...

Racial concerns in, "Cry, the Beloved Country", by Alan Paton.

1476 words - 6 pages Racial Concerns in Cry, the Beloved CountryIn the story, Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton, depicts about Ablsom Kumalo's search for his son in Johannseburg, and he later knew that his son killed white man. His son, Ablsom, is convicted for guilty charges, and that shows that white society is filled with discrimination and injustice. Yet, this murder had brought

Corruption In Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton

624 words - 2 pages Corruption is one of the most prevailing themes in Cry The Beloved Country, as well as in today’s world. In this story the author pictures many different characters in order to represent this wide spread illness of society, John Kumalo, Gertrude, Abasalom, just to name a few. Johannesburg itself is the summary of all that is wrong with cities of today. There is corruption and poverty. Crime runs rampant, and law-abiding citizens are forced to...

"Cry, the Beloved Country", by Alan Paton. Stimulates a Change

1041 words - 4 pages The purpose of Cry, the Beloved Country, is to awaken the population of South Africa to theracism that is slowly disintegrating the society and its people. Alan Paton designs his work toexpress his views on the injustices and racial hatred that plague South Africa, in an attempt tobring about change and understanding. The characters that he...

Use of Title in Cry the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

1384 words - 6 pages Use of Title in Cry the Beloved Country by Alan Paton Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton, takes place in1946 near the small rural town of Ixopo in the smaller village of Ndotsheni. The main character is Stephen Kumalo, a native priest who sets out on a mission to find his family. He receives a letter from a fellow priest, Msimangu, telling him his younger sister is ill. Kumalo decides he must go to Johannesburg to help his sister. He...

The White Man's Fear Depicted in Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

859 words - 3 pages The time of the 1940’s in South Africa was defined by racial oppression of the native inhabitants of the country by the Dutch Boers, also known as the Afrikaners. These people were the demographic minority yet also the political majority. They executed almost complete control over the lives of the natives through asinine rules and harsh punishments. The highly esteemed novel Cry, the Beloved Country tells a story of Stephen Kumalo, a black priest...

Biblical refernces in the book, "Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton.

1831 words - 7 pages Cry, the Beloved CountryThe book "Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton is a book about agitation and turmoil of both whites...

This is a parody on the fairy tale "Hansel and Gretel," using character transfers from "Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton.

1056 words - 4 pages Hansimangu and GrumaloThere is a lovely road that runs from Woodotsheni to Los Angesburg called I-10. I am led into a foreign land where great high buildings tower over me; so many that I cannot count. The blinding lights swallow the darkness of night as Hansimangu and I make our way into Johollywood, the heart of Los Angesburg where our destiny awaits us. It has been two nights and three days since Hansimangu and I have left...

Human Race - Race of Human? Essay about the various aspects of "Cry, The Beloved Country" by Alan Paton

1397 words - 6 pages Human Race - Race of Human?Whose fault is it when people are murderers when they have no other option? Is it the nature of the murderer or is the person shaped to be a murderer by society? Either of these two circumstances, it is the society that creates these unfortunate murderers. The native people of South Africa are the...

Stephen Kumalo and James Jarvis tied to a theme in Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

894 words - 4 pages Onto his village, Kumalo imparts the sense of spirituality and his occupation is that of minister; his journey into Johannesburg alters his perceptions of reality and it is through him that Paton shows the strength that faith can provide strength to those who are worthy and deserving of it and to be used for the greater good. When his brother, John, allows the power of voice that he...

Africa: Cry the Beloved Country

1791 words - 7 pages FCA's:-Completely summarize plot-Discusses at least 2 themes-Uses at least three quotes from the bookThe book "Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton is a book about agitation and turmoil between both whites and blacks over the white segregation policy called apartheid. The book describes how the understanding between whites and blacks can end mutual fear and aggression; and bringing reform and hope to a small...

Similar Essays

Cry, The Beloved Country By Alan Paton

1301 words - 5 pages Alan Paton who was a South African author and anti-apartheid activist wrote the novel Cry, the Beloved Country, The novel publication in 1948 was just before South Africa institutionalized racial segregation under Apartheid. Paton addresses the destruction of the tribal system in South Africa due to white colonization by using the novel as a medium to illustrate is damage. Throughout the novel we are exposed to the numerous problems resulting...

"Cry The Beloved Country" By Alan Paton

1018 words - 4 pages The Breakdown and Rebuilding of South African Society"...what God has not done for South Africaman must do."In the book, Cry, the Beloved Country, written by Alan Paton, some major conflicts follow the story from beginning to end. Two of these conflicts would be as follows; first, the breakdown of the ever so old and respected tribe; and second, the power of love and compassion and how that it can rebuild broken...

Cry, The Beloved Country By Alan Paton

767 words - 3 pages Cry, the Beloved Country is such a controversial novel that people tend to forget the true meaning and message being presented. Paton’s aim in writing the novel was to present and create awareness of the ongoing conflict within South Africa through his unbiased and objective view. The importance of the story lies within the title, which sheds light on South Africa’s slowly crumbling society and land, for it is the citizens and the land itself...

"Cry, The Beloved Country" By Alan Paton.

1842 words - 7 pages The book "Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton is a book about agitation and turmoil of both whites and blacks over the white segregation policy called apartheid. The book describes how understanding between whites and blacks can end mutual fear and aggresion, and bring reform and hope to a small community of Ndotcheni as well as to South Africa as a whole. The language of the book reflects the Bible; furthermore, several characters and...