The Desire To Change One's Self In Harrison Bergeron

631 words - 3 pages

Nowadays, lacking self-confidence is a common human conflict. It can be caused for the society that values better and bigger; it can be hard to overcome people insecurities. Also, many people are afraid of showing their authentic personalities just because of other people, the society stereotypes and expectations. Moreover, a lot of people think about changing other people instead of thinking about how can they make some changes in their lives or make changes about themselves to be better in some different ways. Also, people usually try to be better than others just as a part of a competition instead of trying to be a better person or being better than the person they were before in order to improve their lives.
First of all, a lot of people would prefer to change some others that are better than them in order to stand out in society. They think it would be easier than make an effort to be better as a person. For example, in the story "Harrison Bergeron" it exemplifies how our society in the future have to be average. Furthermore, the law degrades some people for being better looking or advanced intellectually in order to make everybody equally provided with. Therefore, the law creates a method that equalize people. Also, they enforce "handicaps" so nobody would have the typical insecurities about themselves because everybody would be almost the same in every single aspect and nobody would be better than anybody.
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In addition, Harrison Bergeron is the victim of human conflict and tension in the story because he is really handsome, tall, strong, and above average intelligence. Therefore, the law forces him to wear many different things to hide all the talents that God gave him. However, he tries to begin a rebellion but it finally causes his death.
Similarly, a lot of people would prefer to take the place that the law took in the story but...

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