The Evolution Of Families Essay

1298 words - 5 pages

What does the word "family" mean to people today. In order to derive a proper definition, one must first acknowledge that there exists a lot of different types of families. Nevertheless, because family is a major social issue, a single idealized image cannot be promoted. Over the past thirty years families have gone through many rapid change. Trends like dual earner families, women in the labour force, increases in divorce rates, and economic hardship all support the argument that a stable family life is at risk. For women, there is a new form of enslavement, for men, there is a new sense of unease, and for children, there is a future of uncertainty.The traditional family consisting of a working husband, a homemaker wife, and their young children, is slowly becoming obsolete. Today, there is need for a broader and more realistic definition. For example,A family is a social group that may or may not include adults of both sexes, may or may not include one or more children who may or may not have been born in their wedlock (e.g. adopted children, or children by one adult partner of a previous union). The relationship of the adult may be common-law and they may or may not share a common residence. (Vanier, 2000, p.7).Due to vast amount of living arrangements, several other definitions of family's exist. An "extended" family consists of grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, and in-laws, while a nuclear family is a smaller group referring to those related and living in the same household. Moreover, the latter is most common in large cities, where certain jobs require flexible work hours. The irregularity if these hours may therefore deter certain people to be responsible for a family. People rely on family to provide emotional as well as financial support. Further, a family teaches primary socialization skills to children and prepares them for life. In today's fast paced lifestyle, time spent with family is often compromised for other responsibilities and activities. Nowadays, it is rare for children to have a full time parent in the house."What's Happening to the Family", an article by Larry Bumpass, focuses on the interactions between demographic and institutional changes of the family. Bumpass bases most of his reasoning on evolution of our technological culture, which has changed the context of family relationships (Bumpass, 1990, p.483). Bumpass includes many key points (pattern or trends) that are based on the 1987-1988 National Survey of Families and Household in the United States.One of the points Bumpass discusses is Marital Disruption, and the fact that no other changes have significantly altered family life (Bumpass, 1990, p. 485). He mentions that marital disruption is very high, due to the increasing, even in those cultures that disapprove of divorce (i.e. Catholics). Through his research, Bumpass found out that at least half of the children in the United States will spend some time in a single parent home. In addition he describes a few...

Find Another Essay On The evolution of families

The Trials and Effects of Blended Families

1478 words - 6 pages role in every family. However, in blended families is can play a more prominent role. Marrying up or down in socioeconomic status, losing an income, adding an income, and marrying out of financial necessity can all have a profound impact on the development of not only the children involved but the family as a whole. Socioeconomic status (SES) is a measurement of a combination of education, income and occupation (American Psychological

The Breaking Apart of South African Families

2635 words - 11 pages particular importance for black South African families. The desires of the white population to have sufficient labour and to monitor it while reserving urban areas for whites occasioned the government to create restrictive laws starting in the late nineteenth century which were carried into apartheid. These laws and practices broke apart the South African black family and has resulted in enduring consequences for black families and South Africa

The Effects of Gay Marriage on Families

1819 words - 7 pages The Effects of Gay Marriage on Families "Marriage is really important and what we build families on, which is why gay marriage is really important"­Margaret Cho. Gay marriage is one of the most controversial topics out there. Everyone has their own opinion on it, whether it's good or bad. The legalization of gay marriage has various positive effects on families such as divorce rates, children, and the economy. Gay Marriage is a pretty

The Effects of PTSD on Families

1025 words - 4 pages , may think the world is completely dangerous, and no one can be trusted. PTSD was originally thought to just affect the person involved in the incident. New research has shown PTSD can have harmful impacts on families as well (VA). PTSD has negative effects on marriages. Spouses diagnosed with PTSD have symptoms of being less emotional or withdrawn. This can lead to marriage or relationship problems, parenting problems, and poor family

Linaceae, one of the flowering plant families

1222 words - 5 pages Abstrac Key words: Linum austriacum, cotyledonary node, decapitation, direct regeneration. Introduction Linaceae, one of the flowering plant families, consists of genera including Anisadenia, Cliococca, Hesperolinon, Linum, Radiola, Reinwardtia, Sclerolinon and Tirpitzia. The largest genus of the family Linaceae, Linum, contains about 230 species distributed in the worldwide (Heywood, 1985). According to classical taxonomy based on

The Theory Of Evolution

1282 words - 5 pages The theory of evolution, as set forth by Charles Darwin in 1859, stated that all plant and animal life evolved over long period The theory of evolution, as set forth by Charles Darwin in 1859, stated that all plant and animal life evolved over long periods of time from simple to more complicated forms through mutation and adaption. He also taught that only the fittest on each species would survive. This concept is called &quot

The Evolution of Ethics

2894 words - 12 pages The Evolution of Ethics A goal implicit in human evolution is survival; thus, humanity directs some of its energy toward creating a state of peace to achieve the necessary efficiency and conservation of energy to survive in a hostile and sometimes unpredictable world. The foundation of the emergence of rule systems in the world is built upon centuries of reasoned insight and personal experiences that reveal which actions are better than

The evolution of theory

727 words - 3 pages There is a monkey in your family tree. Whether that is fact or theory, and the difference, Stephen Jay Gould explains in, “Evolution as Fact and Theory”, which appeared in the May 1981 issue of Discover Magazine. Mr. Gould was described by the New York Times as, “one of the most influential evolutionary biologists of the 20th century” (Yoon). He wants to show how the creationist's have built their argument against evolution on sand, and the

The Evolution of Sex

2520 words - 10 pages , the species would become extinct. Because of this inescapable fact, the evolution of sex is a very important topic. One may say that sex drives evolution and evolution drives nature, which in turn makes sex the center of existence. When examining the evolution of sex there are many different topics and facts to be looked at closely. This paper will give a brief description of the history of sexual reproduction and how it has evolved over

Evolution of the Sitcom

2253 words - 9 pages The Evolution of the Television Sit-ComSpanning from the early twentieth century to today, from "The Honeymooners" and "I Love Lucy" to "The Simpsons" and "Trailer Park Boys", and from Canada all the way to Japan, the situation comedy is one of the most beloved television program genres worldwide. What defines a situation comedy? How did it get to be so popular? Where and how did it begin? For almost as long as the television itself has been

The Evolution of Technology

1514 words - 6 pages ; however, the evolution of today’s technology has instead created a complicated lifestyle, which has depreciated it’s original purpose. Starting from as early as 1760 to roughly 1850, the United States underwent an amazing transformation, better known as the Industrial Revolution. This era in our society’s history changed the way people lived by creating new forms of technology to reduce manual labor and create easier forms of production

Similar Essays

The Myths Of Families Essay

2137 words - 9 pages Question 1: In The Way We Never Were, Stephanie Coontz suggests that society romanticizes past generations of family life and points out that these memories are merely myths that prevent us from “dealing more effectively with the problems facing today’s families” (Coontz x). Coontz proposes that researchers can take empirical data and create misleading causality for that data, thus feeding cultural myth and/or experience. Coontz believes that

The Blessing Of Blended Families Essay

865 words - 4 pages situations are growing in a daily basis. Creating with these other type of situations known as Blended Families, and sometimes this reality it is very difficult to accept especially for those who have a conservative mindset because they think when those situations arise; they degrade the foundations of the family as they know it. However, something that in no way can be ignored is that “About 75 percent of the 1.2 million Americans who divorce

The Synchronization Of The Genders Within Families

1254 words - 5 pages Working women with families are often lead to inhabit several different lives all at once. In article “The Second Shift,” Arlie Hochschild discusses how women who have families and work are often subjected to having to stay a full time housewife along with their job, creating basically two sets of work, as the author calls it, the Second Shift. I think that the authors’s style of using many studies and examples helps to strengthen his points

The Challenges And Difficulties Of Interracial Families

2128 words - 9 pages get together to create what we call an interracial family. On the surface, interracial families are portrayed as a symbol of "true love" where nothing else matters-whether the colour of your skin is black or white, or whether your eyes are brown or blue. This seemingly near-perfect family union has a reputation where members get along with each other and the rest of society--everybody is happy as a result. However, underneath this surface is the