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The Differences Between Children And Adults In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

802 words - 3 pages


To Kill a Mockingbird
When scout and Jem start to take on the bigger matters in life, they realize that not everything is as it seems. First published in 1960 Harper Lees To Kill a Mockingbird is about a girl’s childhood in the small southern town of Maycomb and how her life changed forever. The novel To Kill a Mockingbird illustrates the cowardice of the county adults and their ingrained prejudices and the braveness of their good hearted children.
Everyone has an innate fear in them and if not careful the fear will come out into the open acting as cowardice. Scout finds gum in the knothole of a tree outside the Radley place; to take someone’s personal item out of greed is stealing and wrong “one afternoon as I raced by something caught my eye and I and caught in such a way that I took a deep breath, a long look around, and went back” (Lee33). Mr. Ewell also has been one for committing mean spirited acts. “This morning Mr. Bob Ewell stopped Atticus on the post office corner, spat in his face, then told him he’d get him if it took the rest of his life”. (Lee290) This is evidence of Bob Ewell’s cowardice, threatening Atticus because he was defending a black man. These tie into Françoise’s quailing acts “François jerked loose and sped into the kitchen ‘nigger lover!’ he yelled(lee83).” He insulted Scout then attempted to hide behind someone who would protect him. Now these are some of the moments of cowardice but there are also moments of bravery.
There are many important traits in a good person, honesty, integrity, compassion—bravery. Atticus shows bravery in not wanting to kill a rabid dog that’s threatening the town “I haven’t shot a gun in 30 years”(Lee33). He thinks he has an unfair advantage of life due to his amazing shooting ability but he knows he has to shoot the voracious dog. This shows true bravery and courage almost as much as Mrs. Dubose. There are powerful influences on life; sadly some of those influences are negative—drugs. Mrs. Dubose was a morphine addict; she made a choice when she found out she was going to die that she would die free from her dependency. “‘Did she die free?’ asked Jem. ‘As the mountain air,’ said Atticus.” This represents how much determination Miss Debose had towards dying...

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