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The Discovery And Impact Of Agriculture

659 words - 3 pages

The discovery of agriculture has led to many profound changes in society. From its origin during the Neolithic era, to its evolution throughout modern society, agriculture has formed and shaped human society to what it is today. Without agriculture, society would still be a hunting and gathering community. However, because of the uncovering of agriculture, early humans were able to grow crops and domesticate animals. Moreover, farming has made a fundamental impact in today’s modern world. Early civilizations greatly utilized this new development by increasing their presence and influence throughout the world. Because agriculture evolved, the population increased, villages and towns ...view middle of the document...

One of the biggest impacts was an increase in population. In 3000 B.C.E., the population was approximately 14 million people. Yet, by the end of 500 B.C.E., the population increased to 100 million people. The human population increased dramatically because of agriculture. Researchers believe that one of the reasons for such a dramatic increase was an increase in food supply. Because humans did not have to hunt for their food and they had an increase in supply, humans started to form families. The males of the family could provide for their wife and children. A population explosion is one of the most important changes that agriculture provided. Likewise, agriculture allowed for early humans to colonize in a single area of the world.
Another effect that agriculture had on society was the emergence of towns and village; as well as, the origin of urban life. Because humans did not have to search for food, the social structure of society took a dramatic change. Thus, towns and villages emerged. One of the earliest known Neolithic community was Jericho— an...

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