The Diseases Of Hunger. Essay

561 words - 2 pages

Diseases that affect humans are many times categorized into either a male disease or a female disease. In other words, the public views the disease as being usually carried by males or by females. Anorexia and bulimia are almost always classified as a disease that affects mostly females. These diseases may also be classified into different categories depending on what their cause is thought to be. Maggie Helwig, author of the short story "Hunger," believes that "anorexia and bulimia are particularly feminine statements about consumption and consumerism." Helwig provides numerous pieces of evidence for her claim, as one can see in the following explanation of this support.Helwig begins by saying that the consumer society has "gone so far we can even buy into hunger." She goes on to say that this is not the reason behind anorexia and bulimia. No girl starves herself nearly to death to be attractive. Instead, Helwig suggests that it is "the nightmare of consumerism acted out in women's bodies." Aside from religious purposes and mental illness, Helwig states that the reasons behind contemporary anorexia and bulimia are "of fairly recent origin." The public was astonished to learn of anorexia as a serious problem in the 1960s and later of bulimia. Helwig also discusses thoughts that many had about these illnesses at the time. People thought that they were simply a fad, when really they were drastically more serious.Helwig's second attempt at proving her claim, discusses the theory that these disorders were part of adolescent rebellion. She states that many believed anorexia should be blamed on over-controlling mothers. This brings Helwig to argue the following point. "Can it be an accident that...

Find Another Essay On The diseases of Hunger.

Overview of the Hunger Games Trilogy

1115 words - 4 pages “I volunteer as tribute,” shouts Katniss Everdeen on Reaping day in District 12 as her younger sister apprehensively walks to the platform after her name is drawn. From this pivotal moment, readers instantly become engrossed and obsessed with the trilogy, “The Hunger Games,” and the succeeding novels; “Catching Fire,” and “Mockingjay” by Suzanne Collins. This moment of strength and fear for the life of a sister, exposes the world to a heroine

The Underlying Genetic Cause of Prion Diseases

2740 words - 11 pages The human genome contains millions of base pairs that are successfully transcribed and translated to yield the gene products necessary for life. On occasion the protein products of translation face mutations that make them lethal to the human condition. In the past decade prion diseases have become more prominent in civilian life like mad cow disease in cattle, kuru in humans, and scrapie in sheep (Araújo, 2013). Prions are proteins that

The Rise of Antibiotic Resistant Diseases

1669 words - 7 pages they spread. DOTS will help prevent antibiotic resistant strains from developing, and when they do, DOTS Plus will ensure that stain does not spread. The steps the WHO are taking with tuberculosis are just one example of steps that are being taken to slow down antibiotic resistance. Overuse of antibiotics is not the only reason for antibiotic resistant strains of diseases. Another cause comes from the use of antibiotics in animal feed. Farmers

Diseases as a Reflection of the Psyche

649 words - 3 pages DISEASES AS A REFLECTION OF THE PSYCHEWanting to know whether or not the human brain hasthe power to cure the body of illness, I set out tofind an article with some cold hard facts. Thisarticle, written by Marcia Angell, Ph.D., elaborates onthe subject of the connection between mental state anddisease.The belief that there is a connection betweenmental and physical health is apparent in the article.It signifies that if a person is in a positive

Richard Rodriquez: The Hunger of Memory

2888 words - 12 pages Richard Rodriquez: The Hunger of MemoryIn studying the social aspects of assimilation of Latin American culture into the United States, Richard Rodriquez' autobiographical novel, The Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodriquez deals with challenges he faced learning not only a new language and culture, but striving to maintain a cohesive relationship with his family. His parents and siblings also had to come to terms with their new

The Discovery of Vaccines Prevented The Spread of Infectious Diseases

1584 words - 6 pages The discovery of vaccines prevented the spread of infectious diseases around the world. Vaccines control the spread of diseases such as measles, tuberculosis, smallpox, and the flu. In addition, vaccines increase the overall health of not only individuals, but of populations. Although these benefits prove effective on the world wide scale, the requirement of vaccinations of children to enter the public school system remains a current public

Common Features of Some of the World's Deadliest Diseases

2469 words - 10 pages There are a number of diseases that are considered significant public health hazards; they include cholera, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and influenza, as well as a number of neglected tropical diseases (NTD). These diseases have caused and continue to cause countless deaths globally. To better understand why these diseases are of such significant we must consider some common features, including both the scientific biological factors and nonbiological

Effects of Third World Diseases on the US

827 words - 3 pages After reading The Coming Anarchy by Robert D. Kaplan and asked to decide which of the issues facing the West Africans would affect the United States the most, many issues swarm through my head. Deforestation, crime, desertification, and polygamy just to name a few. But the diseases that constantly plague third world countries, such as Rwanda, Uganda, and Sierra Leone, seems to me to be the most devastating issue and will have the most impact

Link Between Smoking and the Ocurrence of Cardiovascular Diseases

1794 words - 7 pages Introduction Majority of people associate cigarette smoking and tobacco with lung cancer and breathing problems. However, in addition to these, smoking is a major cause of cardiovascular disease that is, blood vessel and heart diseases. Tobacco and cigarette smoking have been regarded as major risk factors for different chronic diseases Everett (2004). According to AHA (American Heart Association) cigarette smoking is seen as the most

Compare Essay: Hunger Games and Lord of the Flies

975 words - 4 pages Student NameComposition 1September 29, 2014Lord of The Flies is just like The Hunger Games. In Lord of The Flies, a group of kids are stranded on an island. They are forced to survive, or die. In The Hunger Games, a group of kids are stranded in an arena and forced to become survivors or worm food. For Katniss and Ralph they must become leaders, or die. Teams and alliances are made, and of course, some kids die. These children can become leaders

Theme of Loyalty in Homecoming and The Hunger Games

1197 words - 5 pages concepts of love, loyalty, trust, and other virtues are usually included. In the futuristic novel, “The Hunger Games,” by Suzanne Collins, North America has collapsed, and has become 13 districts controlled by an anarchist Capitol. To show their power, the Capitol has issued the Hunger Games, a game in which each district must give two teenagers to fight to the death in an arena. In lieu of her sister, Katniss Everdeen volunteers to take her sister’s

Similar Essays

The Right Kind Of Hunger Essay

994 words - 4 pages Raj Patel’s Stuffed and Starved analyzes the paradoxical content in its title statement. Patel demonstrates how the world food system has created two opposite, but inherently linked epidemics: obesity and crippling hunger. Throughout the course of this book, it becomes painfully clear that the majority of the world’s population is being manipulated by our global food system and by the corporations and their CEO’s who control it. Patel encourages

The Decline Of Infectious Diseases Essay

1393 words - 6 pages In the 1960s, doctors in the United States predicted that infectious diseases were in decline. US surgeon Dr. William H. Stewart told the nation that it had already seen most of the frontiers in the field of contagious disease. Epidemiology seemed destined to become a scientific backwater (Karlen 1995, 3). Although people thought that this particular field was gradually dying, it wasn’t. A lot more of it was destined to come. By the late 1980s

The Base Of Mitochondrial Diseases Essay

1190 words - 5 pages energy production process is termed oxidative phosphorylation because it occurs in the presence of oxygen (Sirrs). If there is a fault in this assembling of energy within the mitochondria, it is known as a mitochondrial disease. Usually the organs affected by these diseases are those that require larger amounts of energy, such as the heart, brain, muscle, and liver (Kurt 11). When this process of mitochondrial disease occurs throughout the body

The Sociology Of The Hunger Games

1266 words - 5 pages In a not-too-distant, some 74 years, into the future the United States of America has collapsed, weakened by drought, fire, famine, and war, to be replaced by Panem, a country divided into the Capitol and 13 districts. Each year, two young representatives from each district are selected by lottery to participate in The Hunger Games; these children are referred to as tributes (Collins, 2008). The Games are meant to be viewed as