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The Doctrines Of Kurt Vonnegut Essay

1423 words - 6 pages

The Doctrines of Kurt Vonnegut          

 

The writing of Kurt Vonnegut exhibits perception without

restriction and imagination without limitation. It surpasses mountains of

ignorance and rivers of innocence to extend emotions for society to

sympathize with reality. He incorporates his knowledge and view-points

into a variety of literary genres for everyone to learn of his inquiries

and philosophies. To draw readers into his sphere of influence, Kurt

Vonnegut administers an inflection on the present to state other tenses

(Schatt 148). From government to technology, he applies his ideas to all

subject matters, allowing all readers to comprehend his beliefs (Nichol

602). The literature of Kurt Vonnegut coincides with his sentiments

appertaining to human substantiality, altruistic love, and

Post-existentialism.

 

            A primary interrogation Vonnegut predominately accentuates is the

meaning of human existence; "What is the purpose of life?" (Holland 54)

Man must feel that he is "serving some purpose," that his life has

substance and significance (55). To find an answer to this question,

Vonnegut unwinds into the pages of his works, man's search for

substantiality, and his attempt at changing his destiny to obtain answers

through power.

 

            Human nature possesses man to hunger for control, and without

dominance, man feels purposeless. By making him "powerless to alter his

destiny in any way,"  Vonnegut stresses an exploration for usefulness, and

the question of life's poignancy is seen with much more clarity (Holland

54). Human predicament is that "man attempts to make order out of chaos.

The universe is absurd, unintelligible, but man must pretend that he

understands it and must try to exert some control over it" to eliminate

futility (54).

 

            In his short story, "Adam," the protagonist, Heinz Knechtmann,

questions the importance of life. His first emotion at fatherhood is

extreme happiness, but other fathers do not feel the same exuberance.

Because others feel that new life has no importance, he feels that he must

as well.

 

                        They don't care. They're all too busy, busy, busy to

                        notice life, to feel anything about it. A baby is born.

                        What could be duller? Who would be so stupid as to
...

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