The Questionable Morals And Values Of The United States

2459 words - 10 pages

During the institution and emerging years of the United States of America to present, we have witnessed some questionable acts committed by the United States. Now days the United States condemn and prosecute nations that get involved in these kinds of tyrannous practices; practices that lead the United States to become the superpower nation today. Often times American people act like if the United States had the ultimate word when it comes to morals and principles. We will go back in time to talk about the massacre and displacement of millions of Natives Americans along with the semi-extinction of their lifestyle and heritage. It is also important to look at the indentured servitude slavery to which the African people were subject to. Another example was the convenient exploitation of the foreign Chinese, Irish and Mexican labor forces and a double standard emigration policy. Lastly the use of intimidation and force for the appropriation of foreign territories such as Hawaii, Philippines. There is help of rising rebels in other countries in order to achieve United States goals. Humans are supposed to learn from past mistakes so they do not commit them again. There is a great irony in calling other governments tyrannous and then imposing our own agenda on their society. The United States have historically and presently demonstrated what could be considered “tyrannous” behavior towards other nations and societies. The United States history has a stain in every page and therefore we are not a good candidate to intervene in other nations affairs.

Growing up our parents taught us several lessons about life values and principles that we are supposed to follow. We learn that human life is precious, we learn that we are all equal, we learn that we have to respect other, we learn that “do not do to others what you do not want done to you” and that we should not steal just to name a few. According to the Oxford Dictionary value is “a person‘s principles or standards of behavior; one’s judgment of what is important in life: they internalize their parents' rules and values.” We grow up under the impression that our parents and country are perfect and that they never did anything wrong. Our parents taught us the principle of accepting our mistakes; so that we could learn from them and never commit them again. We are used to seeing scenarios where kids are prompted by their parents to apologize to another kid for petty mistakes. It is common to relate our childhood to this scenario; we can always picture the parents standing behind the child with their arms crossed and their piercing eyes analyzing every one of the child’s words and moves. Now the kids grow and watch in disbelief how governments operate with double standards and how society turns a blind eye pretending that nothing wrong is happening. Are children the only ones that should be forced to apologize and make changes in behavior? Someone once said that values start at home. Since the United...

Find Another Essay On The Questionable Morals and Values of the United States

The Values, Ideals, and Actions of Fanny Fern

1178 words - 5 pages The Values, Ideals, and Actions of Fanny Fern     Literature from the 1820âs to the 1860âs brought attention to the expanse of the American experience and gave rise to many unique voices. Some of the best writers of this era challenged their fellow citizens to live up to the ideals that the founding fathers had written into America's sacred documents. The voices that cast these challenges are as varied and wide spread in their approach as

Coexistence of Contrary States in Blake’s The Tyger

1890 words - 8 pages Coexistence of Contrary States in Blake’s The Tyger Since the two hundred years that William Blake has composed his seminal poem "The Tyger", critics and readers alike have attempted to interpret its burning question - "Did he who made the Lamb make thee?" Perhaps best embodying the spirit of Blake’s Songs of Experience, the tiger is the poetic counterpart to the Lamb of Innocence from Blake’s previous work, Songs of Innocence. Manifest in

Cultural Values in The Left Hand of Darkness, The Fellowship of the Ring, and Dune

1642 words - 7 pages Shaping of Cultural Values Through Environment in The Left Hand of Darkness, The Fellowship of the Ring, and Dune      Ursuala K. LeGuin's The Left Hand of Darkness was written after J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and Frank Herbert's Dune. One of the most interesting comparisons between the three novels is how the authors treat the issue of cross-cultural misunderstandings. All three works contain many incidents where

Bioterrorist Attack in the United Sates

2166 words - 9 pages relatively low production cost and availability (1). Due to the likelihood of such an attack, the need for good biodefense mechanisms is apparent. Luckily, while most average citizens have spent their time ignoring this threat, the United States government has been avidly preparing biodefense protocols at the federal and state levels. These procedures are often thorough, but rely on the abilities of hospitals and physicians, which is where the

The Characters Hidden Values and Needs in To The Lighthouse

1007 words - 4 pages The Characters Hidden Values and Needs in To The Lighthouse   Woolf's chosen role as an author is to uncover the hidden values and needs of her characters' psychologies, and by extension of this, those of her readers — each frequent realization of the character's is a real and vividly personal epiphany, the like of which 'real-life' persons do not have such a feel for on a day-to-day basis; the characters are in a very real sense perhaps

Invisible Man Essay: Values of the Invisible Man

1313 words - 5 pages grandfathers advice.   Works Cited and Consulted: Bishop, Jack. Ralph Ellison. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1988. Ellison Ralph. Invisible Man. New York: The Modern Library, 1994.  Fabre, Michael. "Wright Richard." Encyclopaedia of African-American Culture and History. 1996 ed. Kelly, Robin D.G. "Communist Party of the United States." Encyclopaedia of African-American  Culture and History. 1996 ed

Use of Character Flaws and Literary Devices to Teach Morals in Oedipus Rex

1316 words - 5 pages Use of Character Flaws and Literary Devices to Teach Morals in Oedipus Rex       The Greek tragedy Oedipus Rex is an excellent example of how an author can use literary techniques and personality traits to teach a certain moral or theme.  In Oedipus Rex, Sophocles communicates his themes and morals to the reader through the character flaws of Oedipus, a tragic hero.  The most prominent character flaw that Oedipus possesses is his

American Values and Success in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

1194 words - 5 pages American Values and Success in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman    The purpose of this brief essay is to examine Arthur Miller's play, Death of a Salesman, with respect to its reflection of the impact of American values and mores as to what constitutes "success" upon individual lives. George Perkins has stated that this play has been described as "possibly the best play ever written by an American (Perkins, p. 710)." The play

Exploration of Values in Robinson Crusoe, Odyssey, Tempest and Gulliver’s Travels

1053 words - 4 pages Exploration of Values in Robinson Crusoe, The Odyssey, The Tempest and Gulliver’s Travels In the novels and epics of Robinson Crusoe, The Odyssey, The Tempest and Gulliver’s Travels the reader encounters an adventurer who ends up on an island for many years and then returns back home.  These four stories have another point in common: they are all unusually popular.  There is something very appealing to the popular imagination about such

Terrorism and the Survival of the Species

1265 words - 5 pages Terrorism and the Survival of the Species   Terrorism is simply a violent form of political communication. The message of September 11, 2001 ran as follows: America, it is time you learned how implacably you are hated. The airplanes used were the terrorist's version of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles aimed at Americas' innocence. That innocence, the terrorists loudly declared, was a luxurious and anachronistic delusion. &nbsp

The Mock-Epic and The Rape Of The Lock

1116 words - 4 pages The Mock-Epic and The Rape Of The Lock The argument can be made that the purpose of the Rape of the Lock is to attack the vanity of women. Pope states this directly in his dedication to Arabella – “to laugh at their sex’s little unguarded Follies,” and the author’s use of the mock-epic seems to reinforce this purpose through its comparison of the epic odyssey to trivial events. In this comparison there can also be found a description

Similar Essays

The Missile Defense System Of The United States

3508 words - 14 pages The Missile Defense System of the United States Abstract      When Ronald Reagan was in the Presidency, he and his staff came up with the idea for a missile defense system that would defend the country in the event of a nuclear missile attack. This system was named "Star Wars" and the basic principal behind it was that it would be a shield that covered all fifty states. However, government officials soon realized that Reagan's defense system

Gang Violence In The United States

1292 words - 5 pages Gang Violence in the United States Gang violence in America is reaching alarming proportions. Chicago police Commander Donald Hilbring states, "Gangs are everywhere. All throughout the city of Chicago, the suburbs, throughout the state, throughout the nation." Chicago police state that so far this year, more than 100 gang-related murders have occurred. Everyday an other report on the evening news relays the tragedy of a child

The Cause Of The Endless Wars Against The United States Of America

1873 words - 7 pages The continuing successful and attempted terrorist attacks in the USA and the endless wars and conflicts in which we are involved are a manifestation of political, economical and imperialistic failures in Arab lands.  This was supported by Western society with the United States as the largest of powers.  Instability, oppression, poverty and political alienation that the citizens of many Islamic-Arab nations experienced within the last

Character, Values And Morals In Huckleberry Finn

1820 words - 7 pages Character, Values and Morals in Huckleberry Finn       Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn is perhaps one of the most controversial novels the North American Continent has ever produced.  Since its publication more than a hundred years ago controversy has surrounded the book.  The most basic debate surrounding Twain's masterpiece is whether the book's language and the character of Jim are presented in a racist manner.  Many have called for the