The Simple Gift, Numb, And The Matrix

1247 words - 5 pages

Humans by nature, desire to have connections with other individuals in order to have a sense of self worth. Many factors contribute to these connections. The free verse novel The Simple Gift by Steven Herrick, the song Numb by Linkin Park and the film The Matrix all demonstrate that some people purposely disconnect themselves from having connections with other individuals because for them to connect they would first have to modify their personality, people’s life choices can hinder or assist them in forming associations with other people and a person’s measure of how much they belong is defined by their popularity or social status amongst their peers.
For most people having relationships and connections with other people is critical in living a content and fulfilling life, some people however are exception to this and they purposely lack motivation to connect with others. These people justify their actions by declaring that for them to connect they would first have to modify their personality, an action they do not wish to perform. In The Simple Gift, Billy the main character describes his disconnection with his hometown and especially his father, someone he openly despises. Herrick has used imagery to portray the town in which Billy resides in “This place has never looked so rundown and beat”. Billy having this hatred for his town left his home and now plans on wondering the streets as a homeless man. Even though Billy despised his town he still had connections to it, however negative they may have been, now being homeless he has lost these attachments, but he is perfectly contempt with this because he felt if he had tried to belong in his hometown he would have had to change himself and most likely end up like his father.
The protagonist portrayed in the song Numb, believes there are fallacies in what society deems as normal and believes a “normal person” cannot be described. The composer has used repetition of the line “I’m tired of being what you want me to be”, this repeated phase shows the protagonist is unwilling to attempt to connect with society because he believes if he was to belong he would first have to conform and in the process remove his individuality, an action he is against.
The main character Neo in the movie The Matrix is a computer hacker who is constantly in hiding from the law, so naturally he is very reclusive as it is in his best interests. The directors have used a high angle shot of Neo’s apartment to show his secrecy especially depicted by the several locks guarding his door. This shows the effect on him from being such a reclusive individual and that he has become a custom to not having any attachments with society. Neo could easily quit his dangerous lifestyle but to him his hacking indentifies him as an individual something he does not want to lose, it is this inability to let go of his lifestyle which is what erodes Neo’s ability to belong.

A person’s life choices can either hamper or aid them in forming...

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