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The Economic Development Of Ghana Essay

996 words - 4 pages

The Economic Development of Ghana
Ghana is an African country located on the western side of Africa. Its neighbors are Burkina Faso to the north, Togo to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the south, and Cote D'Ivoire to the west. It has a population of 18,100, 703 and a population density of 197 people per square mile. Ghana is 92,098 square miles and English is its official language. The capital city of Accra has around 1, 673,000 people residing in it. There are the physical statistics, now onto the more interesting part.

The country's greatest strengths lie in its natural resources. In those terms, it is very rich. Cocoa, its biggest export, accounts for 15% of the world's supply. Also its gold production, in recent years, it's exported as many as one million fine ounces. Ghana also has a good supply of bauxite, diamonds, coffee, rice, cassava, timber and rubber. Moreover, since 1983, the economy has steadily grown. With economic recovery policies intact, the economy has raised 5% a year since 1983. Tourism also is growing within Ghana. Tourist rates are increasing also. With all these cash crops, costly goods, and economic restructuring, one would wonder why they need assistance at all.
Ghana's weaknesses though, almost outweigh the strengths. Like most countries in Africa, Ghana is in heavy debt since its independence in 1957. It also suffers from high budget deficits. All of the foreign investors that come in only invest in the gold fields. The richest business, Ghana isn't getting that profit. Because of clearing the land for farm use and urbanization, 70% of the forest has been destroyed. With the new urban communities and mining, pollution is a very serious problem in this small nation.
As for other statistics that are related, its farming does well because of the two rainy seasons. There is only one doctor for every 12,523 people, but because of hygienic lessons, that doesn't cause too much of a problem. The major causes of death are malaria, diarrheal diseases, and tuberculosis (due to the pollution). As for regions, the north is rather poor, while the urban south is richer.

Now I chose Ghana for multiple reasons. First of all, because I always thought that Ghana was near the Philippines for some reason. So I decided that it'd be good for me to research it. Also, as I said, Ghana is very rich in natural resources. If you helped them get off on the right foot, not only could they help themselves, but you could make some money also. Ghana would also be a good place for economic help because all of its close neighbors also. If a neighboring country saw that what they were doing was working, they'd either mimic them or ask them for help (as long as the countries weren't enemies). So hopefully it'd spread throughout the region.

Now for government. The history of Ghana and its politics is very violent and turbulent. It has a long history of coups and militant overthrows,...

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