This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Effects Of Class Structure Essay

1826 words - 8 pages

Class Structures in the 1920’s
The emerging inequitable class systems and antagonisms of the nineteen twenties saw the traditional order and moral values challenged, as well as the creation of great wealth for few and poverty for many. The Great Gatsby, written by Francis Scott Fitzgerald, explores the causes and effects of the unbalanced class structures. Fitzgerald outlines the idea that the desire to accumulate wealth and status is a common ambition amongst the lower classes; when that desire is reached, the traditional upper class is challenged by the emerging newly wealthy, which finally leads to destructive consequences. By creating rigid class structures, traditional upper class, new wealth, and the poor in The Great Gatsby, it is shown that the desire to further or maintain socio-economic status leads to immoral behaviour such as criminal activity, adultery, and murder.
By incorporating a distinct hierarchy into society, it creates the aspiration to accumulate wealth and status as a common goal amongst the lower class, yet also creates the desire for the traditional upper class to maintain dominance. Gatsby, at a youthful age desires to become a prosperous and wealthy man, the upper echelon of society. By becoming Gatsby, Gatz truly believes that he can leave his past and create a new class, the Great Gatsby himself:
I suppose he’d had the name ready for a long time, even then. His parents were shiftless and unsuccessful farm people — his imagination had never really accepted them as his parents at all. The truth was that Jay Gatsby of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself. He was a son of God — a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that — and he must be about His Father’s business, the service of a vast, vulgar, and meretricious beauty. (Fitzgerald 98)
Nick strongly suggests that Gatsby vows to change his identity and distance himself from the rural, lifeless and poor living that his unsuccessful farming parents pursued. The platonic conception of himself alludes to Platonic Idealism, which states that there are always universal and initial truths or ideas that cannot be altered or dissipate. Gatsby comes from the Platonic conception of Gatz and by comparing Gatsby to Platonic Idealism, the idea of Gatsby becomes immortalized and genuine. Gatsby, representing the lower class desires to alter his status to an unalterable conception, which epitomizes the new money’s desires. Tom Buchanan, the embodiment of the traditional upper class, is a domineering man who desires only one result, to maintain his status and wealth. Tom obsesses over maintaining a pure, rich class of Caucasians that he believes should never be challenged: “‘It’s up to us, who are the dominant race, to watch out, or these other races will have control…this idea is that we’re Nordics. I am, and you are, and you are, and…we’ve produced all the things that go to make civilization- oh, science and art, and all that’” (13). The...

Find Another Essay On The Effects of Class Structure

Effects of Patriarchal Family Structure Essay

811 words - 4 pages Mill is concerned with the political repercussions of the unequal status of women within families. In a patriarchal family structure, wives are kept ignorant about politics and issues that occur outside of their homes and do not directly involve their families. Mill laments that a wife “neither knows nor cares which is the right side in politics, but she knows what will being in money or invitations, give her husband a title, her son a place, or

Class Structure, Warfare, Family Life, Religious Practices, and Agriculture Are Aspects of the Aztec’s culture

756 words - 4 pages Class structure, warfare, family life, religious practices, and agriculture are all aspects of the Aztec’s culture. The Aztecs had a legend about the beginning of their empire. The legend said that the gods will send an eagle perched on a cactus and have a snake in its mouth. This was than the right place to build their empire. The Aztecs were a powerful empire that prospered. The first important aspect in the Aztec’s culture was class

Effects of Classroom Structure on Student Learning

1369 words - 5 pages academic structure to educate their class and the way they instruct to make their classroom’s function is focused merely on goals of students, class orientations, and motivation for learning. “The results of this study suggested that teacher candidates' perception of class structure, motivational beliefs, and self-regulation of learning differ as a function of their personal goal orientations.” Though the goals the professor has for him/herself

Effects of African American Family Structure

568 words - 3 pages Effects of African American Family Structure on School Attitudes and Performance In today's world, there is such a big emphasis on education and its importance. And there should be an emphasis. Unfortunately, not everyone has the same attitude about receiving a good education. This article attempts to discuss the attitudes of African American's towards education when a stable family structure is absent. Given, not all homes are

The Effects of Family Structure of Origin on Offspring Cohabitation Duration

847 words - 3 pages The Effects of Family Structure of Origin on Offspring Cohabitation DurationResearch has been done to understand if different family structures, or living situations, have an effect on offspring cohabitation duration. Research in such areas as divorce, living separations, parental education, remarriage, and death has been done to help one understand cohabitation. Different tests, exams, and observations have been produced to exam this

Effects of Industrialization and the Conditions of the Working Class in England

1347 words - 5 pages Effects of Industrialization and the Conditions of the Working Class in England In the middle of the 19th century the industrial revolution was flourishing in England. With all of the advancements in machinery there would be new opportunities and drawbacks for citizens. Many would leave their lives on the farms and work in factories with unsafe settings. Karl Marx felt that the new advancements in society were able to support

The structure of memory

1799 words - 7 pages Introduction Prior research into the structure of memory have suggested that memory is comprised up from three separate stores each performing a specific and relatively inflexible function (in Passer, Smith, Holt, Bremner, Sutherland, & Vliek, 2009). That is the multi-store model, developed by Atkinson & Shiffrin (1968 in Passer et al., 2009) who claim a sensory memory store, short-term memory store (STM) and a long-term memory store (LTM

The Explorations of Structure

1642 words - 7 pages . This mindset is what inspired cinematic innovation within the post-war period— art movements such as the French New Wave and Italian neo-realism emerged. Filmmakers like Jean-Luc Godard rejected the traditional conventions of cinematography, editing and structure and chose to create their own. Rooted in the Italian Neo-Realism movement in the fifties, Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini rejected the idea of realist films and sought to explore

The Class of Gentlemen

1232 words - 5 pages education and how a person was treated. The character can either let social class define them or not. Joe and Magwitch were affected by their social class in the novel, but they did not let their class define them. However, Pip, at times let the social structure control him, until he figured out that “ money doesn't buy happiness.” Magwitch had grown up going in and out of jail. Due to how low he was on the social ladder, he had no real

The Death Of Class?

523 words - 3 pages Contemporary class analysis must embrace the study of a wider range of social relationships than just those located within the sphere of work and production. Patterns of consumption and the lifestyles and opportunities that they facilitate have become particularly important in understanding the divisons and inequality on which the system of stratification is based in modern industrial societies.Some post-modern theorists have gone even further

The Importance of Class

1133 words - 5 pages A runaway slave, Jim was looked at differently by society because of his skin color. His intelligence and selflessness was overlooked daily by Ms. Watson, his owner. According to society, Jim’s character class as a slave puts him at the bottom. He had nothing, not even his family who was separated from him early in his years as Ms. Watson’s slave. Her character status was looked at as one higher than Jim, allowing her to have hegemony

Similar Essays

The Colliding Dynamics Of Class Structure

1712 words - 7 pages The rigidity of class structure is the culprit for the vast number of inequities in society. Power is concentrated in the hands of a small sector; leaving a few individuals to have more authority and influence, in comparison to others. The construction of class structure identifies the way groups are divided into social positions. Differences stemming from social position are further exemplified by the accessibility to valuable resources–such as

The Colliding Dynamics Of Class Structure

1823 words - 7 pages The rigidity of class structure is the culprit for the vast number of inequities in society. Power is concentrated in the hands of a small sector; leaving a few individuals to have more authority and influence, in comparison to others. The construction of class structure identifies the way groups are divided into social positions. Differences stemming from social position are further exemplified by the accessibility to valuable resources–such as

The Effects Of Social Class Essay

2195 words - 9 pages The Effects of Social Class Social class in a society is a concept in the areas of social sciences and political theories. Social class means “socio-economic class” it is based on the social, economic and educational status of individuals being grouped in the same level. It mainly varies of the economic status of the family because the other aspects in life depend on that one material object. This means we have made monetary value an important

The Effects Of Industrialisation On The Structure Of The Family

1364 words - 5 pages The Effects of Industrialisation on the Structure of the Family The pre- industrial family was said to be an extended family consisting of three generations, the children, parents and the grandparents. The family would all work together in the farms to help provide for the entire families needs, children as young a 5 or 6 would have been found work to do. However this was until the Industrial revolution when factories