The Effects Of Depression Essay

828 words - 3 pages

The Effects of Depression


Depression is one of the most common psychological problems. Each year over 17 million Americans experience a period of clinical depression. Thus, depression affects nearly everyone through personal experiences or through depression in a family member or friend.

Depression can interfere with normal functioning, and frequently causes problems with work, social life and family life. It causes pain and suffering not only to those who have a disorder, but also to those who care about them. Serious depression has been known to destroy family life as well as the life of the depressed person.

According to Psychology Information Online, depression is a psychological condition that changes how a person thinks and feels, and it also affects their social behavior and sense of physical well being. Depression has been called a "whole body" illness because of the many things the illness affects.

Depression affects everyone. According to Psychology Information Online, women are more at risk for depression. This is due to factors that are directly related to women such as reproductive, hormonal, genetic or other biological factors; abuse and oppression; interpersonal factors; and certain psychological and personality characteristics. In general, it has been found that people who have low self-esteem, who consistently view themselves and the world with pessimism, or who are readily overwhelmed by stress are more prone to depression. Psychologists often describe social learning factors as being significant in the development of depression, as well as other psychological problems. A serious loss, chronic illness, relationship problems, work stress, family crisis, financial setback, or any unwelcome life change can trigger a depressive episode. Very often, a combination of biological, psychological, and environmental factors are involved in the development of depressive disorders, as well as other psychological problems (Psychology Information Online).

It has been suggested that depression comes from a chemical imbalance in the brain, but now it seems the opposite is true. According to Psychology Information Online, the chemical imbalance is a result of the depression. It has been found that the chemical imbalances that occur during depression usually disappear when the patient completes psychotherapy for depression, without taking any medications to correct the imbalance.

The symptoms of depression may vary from person to person, and also depend on the severity of the depression. According to drkoop.com there are nine classic symptoms of depression:
1. Depressed mood for most of the day
2. Disturbed appetite or change in weight
3. Disturbed sleep
4. Psychomotor retardation or agitation
5. Loss of interest in previously pleasurable activities; inability to enjoy usual hobbies or activities
6. Fatigue or loss of energy
7. Feelings of...

Find Another Essay On The Effects of Depression

Causes and Effects of The Great Depression in America

3738 words - 15 pages Few Americans in the first months of 1929 saw any reason to question the strengthand stability of the nation's economy. Most agreed with their new president that thebooming prosperity of the years just past would not only continue but increase, and thatdramatic social progress would follow in its wake. 'We in America today,' HerbertHoover had proclaimed in August 1928, 'are nearer to the final triumph over poverty thanever before in the history...

Oppression and Depression: The Effects of White Masculinity

2823 words - 11 pages Oppression and Depression: The Effects of White Masculinity In Peter N. Stearns’ book Be a Man! he cites Nichols, Pleck and Sawyer as he makes the assertion that “Macho man, artificially and oppressively virile, asserts himself over hapless women and in fields of aggression ranging from big business to war, from raising of sons to the domestic cloistering of wives” (Nichols, Pleck and Sawyer). White men in America throughout history have...

The Social Effects During The Great Depression

595 words - 2 pages The social effects during the great depression.In the early 1930's there was the great depression. This was caused when the market went into recession and did not recover causing the markets to crash and people lost all of their money. The great depression effected all of the people in many ways, one of the ways was socially. Firstly: The most effected people were the working class. Secondly: The class which was effected a little was the middle...

Symptoms and Long-Term Effects of Depression

840 words - 3 pages Depression is a psychiatric disorder characterized by an inability to concentrate, insomnia, loss of appetite, feelings of extreme sadness, guilt, helplessness and hopelessness, and thoughts of death. People that are depressed have sadness greater and more prolonged than that warranted by any objective reason. It is a serious illness that affects thoughts, feelings, and the ability to function in everyday life. Thirteen to fourteen million...

Effects and Treatments of Postpartum Depression

1555 words - 6 pages Postpartum Depression is a form of depression that is related to pregnancy and childbirth. It is sometimes viewed as a complication of giving birth because it occurs after the child is born. Although, not every case is severe, there is a high percentage of women that do experience the milder case. There are two types of postpartum, or otherwise known as perinatal depression that interfere with routines of daily life: Baby blues or Early onset...

A Comprehensive Examination of The Far-Reaching Effects of The Great Depression

1365 words - 5 pages The Depression affected the varying economic and social classes in different ways. The experience of the Depression obviously had a negative impact on the country as a whole but some groups of society were still able to flourish. In addition to economic and social class, geographic location also played a role in experience of Americans during the Depression. Those unlucky citizens that lived in the Great Plains states were also dealing with...

Causes and Effects of The Great Depression in the United States

1606 words - 6 pages The Great Depression is a defining moment in time for not only American, but world history. This was a time that caused political, economical, and social unrest. Not only did the Great Depression cause a world wide panic, it also caused a world wide crisis unlike any before it. This paper will analyze both the causes and the effects of the Great Depression in the United States of America. One cause of the depression is the effects of World War...

The Global Effects of Imperialism, World War I and the Great Depression

1725 words - 7 pages The Global Effects of Imperialism, World War I and the Great Depression Bentley first talked about cross-cultural interactions as a way to...

The effects and causes of bipolar disorder / manic depression. (Includes work cited, parenthetical documentation.)

1196 words - 5 pages Manic Depression, or Bipolar Disorder as it's medically referred to is a mood disorder that affects approximately 1% of the adult population of the United States (BPI). Manic Depression is an affective disorder, much as clinical depression is, though manic depression is usually more severe and effects equal numbers of men and women, unlike clinical depression which seems to effect more women than men. Mood swings are highly frequent, and feelings...

The Effects of Aerobic Exercise Among Adolescents with Mild to Moderate Depression

3389 words - 14 pages The Effects of Aerobic Exercise Among Adolescents with Mild to Moderate Depression Kaplan and Sadock (as cited in Brollier, Hamrick & Jacobson, 1994) stated that depression, during the teen years, has become an increasing area of concern in psychiatry (Kaplan & Sadock, 1991. Kashani, Carlson, Beck, Hoeper, Corcoran, McAllister, Fallahi, Rosenberg and Reid (as cited in Brollier, Hamrick ,& Jacobson, 1994) studied the prevalence of...

The Effects of Dietary Intake on the Production of Neurotransmitters Related to the Onset of Depression in Humans

2274 words - 9 pages Effects of Dietary PAGE 6 Running head: EFFECTS OF DIET ON DEPRESSION ONSETThe Effects of Dietary Intake on the Production of Neurotransmitters Related to the Onset of Depression in HumansDavid Samuel FloresGranite State CollegeAbstractTo explore the effects of dietary intake on the production of neurotransmitters related to the onset of depression in humans, I have researched various scientific texts and websites detailing scientific studies...

Similar Essays

Effects Of The Great Depression Essay

2145 words - 9 pages Effects of the Great Depression The introduction of the discussion will focus on the origins of the Great Depression and the escalating events that led to it. This will provide adequate foundations to bring up questions and attempt to answer them in an objective fashion as to why and how the Depression affected different industrialized countries in different ways. The core of the debate will consist of detailed...

Causes And Effects Of The Great Depression

3996 words - 16 pages C:\MSOFFICE\WINWORD\TEMPLATE\NORMAL.DOTApril 2, 1997The Causes and Effects ofThe Great Depression In AmericaFew Americans in the first months of 1929 saw any reason to question the strength and stability of the nation's economy. Most agreed with their new president that the booming prosperity of the years just past would not only continue but increase, and that dramatic social progress would follow in its wake. "We in America today," Herbert...

Effects Of Ability On Depression Essay

2545 words - 10 pages Does Administering Abilify Decrease Depression in Rats? Depression, for the purpose of this paper, is defined as the lethargy and immobility a rat experiences when put into a tank full of water during a forced swim test (Wee, Wang, Woolverton, Pulvirenti, & Koob, 2007). It is measured by the inability of the rat to swim, climb or keep their heads above the water over a short span of time (Arunrut, Alhandre, Chen, Cha, & Russo-Neustadt, 2009). ...

What Were The Effects Of The Great Depression?

1294 words - 5 pages During the Great Depression of the 1930s, millions of families were struggling to live on incomes so meager that the threat of starvation hung over them everyday. The great depression had brought millions to unemployment and an increase in poverty. People who remained with their jobs experienced salary cuts and those without jobs lived with the help of friends, family, or just waited out the economic downturn (Freedman 10). The cause and blame of...