The Effects Of Famine Essay

729 words - 3 pages

The Effects of Famine Have you experienced a famine? I bet most of you haven't because nowadays most countries are away from the famine. It is terrible to experience a famine. However, there are many famines which happened in the history, and happened in few areas. Famines have many negative effects in the world, and the three main effects are slow social development, high death rate, and lack of morality.First, the famine puts social development off. First of all, the famine itself is a form of social regression. Also, it causes social regression. Many people were dead in famines. Who will work in factory? Who will grow crops? Who will join the army to protect the country? Nobody. The labor force is important for social development. Moreover, a famine doesn't only last a week or a month. It usually lasts more than a year. Therefore, an area or a country would stop developing for more than a year. Compare with other areas or countries, the famine area falls behind too much. However, it doesn't only stop developing during the famine. After the famine, the area still needs few years to recover itself. The famine not only causes death, but also makes people move out the area. The hungry will not stay at home waiting for death. They want to keep alive and they don't want to commit a crime. They choose to move out of the famine area. After people die and move out, the area might be a no man's land. It is difficult to develop an area without people.Second, the famine makes the death rate high. To avoid death, the hungry eat everything which can fill their belly. Bark, bugs, grass, or even cotton can be eat by the hungry. Those "foods" may help them fill their belly, but they only fill the belly because they are not able to be digested. Over time, the hungry would lack nutrition and die. Meanwhile, the succedaneous foods are not healthy. Some foods cause disease. Dirty food, spoiled food, and bugs make people sick. During the famine, if someone gets sick, that means he or she is probably going to die. However, the only healthy food in a famine maybe...

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