The Ramifications Of Government Reform On Education

1774 words - 7 pages

America currently ranks 36th in the world in regards to education. This encompasses reading, math, and science. Education in the United States represents multiple achievement gaps across ethnicities, income levels, and geography. There are many reasons as to why America ranks low. The curriculum in the United States varies widely from district to district and stretches from state to state, which is one of the major problems in why America compares greatly to that of other countries. For instance, different schools offer different classes. In some schools classes that may be a requirement for students might not even be an option for others at a school that may be right across town. This pertains especially to public and private schools. Private schools are funded differently from those that are public thus making it difficult to allow students an equal opportunity when their school in most cases cannot afford it. Also, factors such as race, gender, affirmative action, and even language play a significant role in the plight of students receiving an education in America. However, government acts like No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and Common Core curriculums have been put into effect in order to reverse America’s position. They are best understood as tools to bridge the achievement gap regardless of what a child may look like, sound like, or what part of the nation they come from. These programs are designed to help all children excel in school no matter what. Even though the No Child Left Behind Act significantly increased the average performance of children in math in both lower and top percentiles, it should be regarded as a reform act that actually hindered children in learning due to the expectation of only meeting the minimum requirements with nothing to reach for afterwards.
Enacted by President George Bush in January of 2002, No Child Left Behind is a standards based education reform based on the thesis that setting high standards and establishing measurable goals can improve individual outcomes in education. As a result, states are required to develop assessments on basic skills. These assessments vary and can be given on any subject with varying frequencies. Because the act does not enforce a national achievement standard, each state develops its own standards. Therefore, the requirements, expectations, and achievements are diverse.
“The No Child Left Behind Act promotes the idea that competition between schools will increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the education system. At the same time, the rhetoric of NCLB maintains the progressive message of the “Common School” era” (Aske, Connolly, Corman, 107) In essence, it is contradictory. On the one hand the act wants competition so that students will learn more and want to achieve more. However, it also wants all schools to be on the same level or playing field so that they are equal. In order to achieve with competition some will have to be left behind, therefore there is no real...

Find Another Essay On The Ramifications of Government Reform on Education

The Ramifications of Teenage sex Essay

1428 words - 6 pages remains the single most important reason for increased poverty amongchildren over the last twenty years, as documented in the 1998 Economic Report ofthe President. Out-of-wedlock childbearing (as opposed to divorce) is currently thedriving force behind the growth in the number of single parents, and half of firstout-of-wedlock births are to teens. They tend to rely heavily on the Child WelfareService provided by the government, things such as AFDC

The Ramifications of Genetic Modification Essay

806 words - 4 pages altered organism as well as of those who ingest them; consequently, they have caused human health problems, environmental problems, and unexpected genetic mutations. While numerous studies on GMOs have been conducted, there is still substantial uncertainty about the potential effects on health. Some patterns that have been recognized are allergies, depletion of necessary enzymes, and infertility in consumers of GM food crops. Since the allergies

The Role of Education in Welfare Reform

1894 words - 8 pages advantage at securing a job that will provide the financial freedom needed to end their dependency on the welfare system and also the cycle of poverty. According to an article written by Gayle Hamilton and Judith M. Gueron called “The Role of Education and Training in Welfare Reform” highlights how single mothers collecting welfare benefits have been pressured to find jobs instead of pursuing an education. These women are only able to secure low

The Social-Political Ramifications of Immigration

2429 words - 10 pages help limited English speakers, “[a]n executive order issued in 2000 by the Clinton administration sought to clarify that, ordering federal agencies and organizations receiving federal funds to ensure they have a system that provide services for limited English proficiency residents so they can have meaningful access to them” (Armas). Although this was just a minor reform, it helped inform them of the things going on so they did not feel left out

The Social-Political Ramifications of Immigration

2061 words - 9 pages ”, “An executive order issued in 2000 by the Clinton administration sought to clarify that, ordering federal agencies and organizations receiving federal funds to ensure they have a system that provide services for limited English proficiency residents so they can have meaningful access to them” (Armas). Although this was just a minor reform, it helped inform them of the things going on so they did not feel left out like they had previously. After

The Psychological Ramifications of Global Environmental Change

978 words - 4 pages ). In fact it is understandable. Of course this constant spinning of end-of-the-world outcomes is our own hardly something we can blame on anyone else. Between self appointed gurus making dire predictions and our naïve assimilation of them into our daily lives it is likely we will not see society as a whole move toward a more positive attitude. H.G. Wells is attributed as saying that “The end of everything we call life is close at hand and cannot be

The Evolving Role of Government Education

1211 words - 5 pages The Evolving Role of Government in Education What are the roles of federal and state government when it comes to American education? The roles of education have evolved from historic liabilities to current liabilities. There are many laws and cases that have had an impact on American education that still has a strong influence on education today such as the debate between church and state, racial desegregation, and education finances. Other

Political Science Position Paper on Education Reform

2156 words - 9 pages American education (Sass Ed.D)." Of most concern, where unionization is involved, are the issues of teacher tenure, pay based on seniority rather than merit, and full pay while laid off under suspension or investigation for suspected wrongdoing. All of these issues are under a microscope under the current political climate. Since 1919, no less than 16 individual reform efforts, educational concepts and/or proposed legislation efforts have been

The Potential Effects and Ramifications of Global Warming

1382 words - 6 pages ) states, “human activities, if unchecked in the next decade, could destroy one of the earth’s principle mechanisms for cooling itself” (p.291). The world needs to address the potentially disastrous consequences of our earth’s rapidly changing climate by acknowledging the existence of global warming and understanding its impact on the present and future generations. The greenhouse effect is a natural process that keeps the earth at temperatures

Impacts and Ramifications of Stress in the Workplace

1887 words - 8 pages In the workplace, stress can have some strong physical and mental effects on employees. To best understand stress, it is first important to define it. Stress is defined as “a feeling of tension that occurs when a person perceives that a given situation is about to exceed one’s ability to cope and consequently could endanger one’s well being” (Hitt, Miller & Colella, 2011). Stress on the job is usually the result of people feeling inadequate

Education Reform: A Change for the Better

2945 words - 12 pages . Without first fixing these issues the new system runs the risk of being ineffective in better helping students for the future. With this wave of education reform comes with it another change, the way these assessments will be administered. Common Core State Standards assessments are planned to be taken through a computer, not through pencil and scantron as previous state assessments were once taken. This means educators must also work on a

Similar Essays

The Need For Government Intervention In Education Reform

2611 words - 10 pages , and social studies, to name a few. OUTCOME BASED EDUCATION MOVEMENT         The decade of the 80s brought numerous education reforms, but few of them were a dramatic shift from what has gone on before. Outcome-based education (OBE) is one of those that is new, even revolutionary, and is now being promoted as the panacea for America's educational woes. This reform has been driven by educators in response to demands for greater accountability

Economic Ramifications Of The War On Drugs

969 words - 4 pages public safety programs struggling to operate on meager funding. The basic economic principles of supply and demand shows how distorted the governments reasoning truly is. Resources are poured into criminal justice and banning policies intended to reduce the supply of drugs, while disregarding treatment and education approaches that may diminish drug demand. The blind one sided focus on supply reduction imposed by the government has become an

Economic Ramifications Of The War On Drugs

1104 words - 5 pages safety programs struggling to operate on meager funding. The basic economic principles of supply and demand shows how distorted the governments reasoning truly is. Resources are poured into criminal justice and banning policies intended to reduce the supply of drugs, while disregarding treatment and education approaches that may diminish drug demand. The blind one sided focus on supply reduction imposed by the government has become an

The Ineffectiveness Of Education Reform Essay

544 words - 2 pages On January 8, 2002 President Bush signed into law the Leave No Child Behind Act, which significantly changes how public schools receive federal funding. This bipartisan-supported attempt at reform, the first of this magnitude since the Elementary-Secondary Education Act of 1965, shows a dedicated concern to improving education. However, it is not plausible a punishment/rewards system will positively improve schools on a large scale as a