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The Elements Of Fortune And Contentment Dissected In Great Expectations

828 words - 4 pages

Would you rather be prosperous and disheartened or common and jovial with your life? Joe Gargery showed that wealth doesn’t define one’s personality but personality defines ones wealth, Miss Havisham shows that wealth is everything but that emotions don’t matter, and Jaggers shows that some gentlemen have dispirited lives despite all of their riches. Characters in the novel such as Joe Gargery, Miss Havisham, and Jaggers represent that life is not always perfect whether someone is rich or poor. In the novel, Great Expectations, Charles Dickens uses the element of fortune and social class to show the dynamic of how wealth doesn’t guarantee contentment.
Joe Gargery, Pip's brother-in-law and a benevolent blacksmith , is very satisfied with his status as a member of the lower class. He believes that he’s “wrong out of the forge” (224) and well off working in what he senses is his rightful place. In an unqualified, typical lower class setting Joe is contented and able to be himself, but he feels abnormal and tense in a higher-class, environment. He feels out of place in Miss Havisham’s mansion, Satis House, a vast dissimilarity from his own modest home. Joe targets all his answers to Miss Havisham’s queries at Pip, displaying abnormal uneasiness and a “great politeness” (99). Joe, in all his inelegance around rich personalities and having no material wealth himself, is impeccably able to find cheerfulness. Joe Gargery really doesn’t worry if he’s the underprivileged or costliest man but, what truly matters to him the superiority of one’s heart. In conclusion, his outlooks on the sophisticated class won’t change and he will always remain peculiar with them.
Miss Havisham critically acclaimed as the utmost prosperous among Kent and Estella, her daughter, is identified as the fairest of them all with her mysterious personality, but wealth doesn’t mean there wouldn’t be a non-dysfunctional environment. Her entire life has been in ruins by money, because her own fiancé broke off their engagement since his only intention was to thieve her money. Magwitch stated he met a man by the name of Compeyson who “had the head of the devil" (367). Compeyson had his hand in everything illegal: swindling, forgery, and other white collar crime and unfortunately, Miss Havisham . Due to her devastation from the annulled wedding, her life since that day has been spent in Satis House, indignant and hopeless. Her long-broken heart makes her want only vengeance on the...

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