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The End Of A Way Of Live; The Indian Removal Act Of 1830

961 words - 4 pages

The defining moment when all the native American Indians were now no longer eligible to stay in their homes the act known as the Indian Removal Act of 1830. This policy was the decision of not only the new North American people but that of the seventh president Andrew Jackson. This White Anglo-Saxon Protestant (WASP) president was the last barrier standing between the Native American Lands and New Americans, who would receive land when the Native American were removed. This Act was contracted to favor the new immigrants and dispense with the natives whose families, past, animals, way of live was already integrated and established in this locations.
First, The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was created by the “white” federal government, to whom the Cherokee would fall victim, whose only goal was to acquire land to expand out west by the removal of Native Americans. This act came about because of the new Louisiana Purchase that provided United States with more land; therefore render more expansion for this new “white” American population. This act was enforced by the military which would lead the first the four civilized Indian to move, and then forcible removal of the last Native Americans group standing the Cherokees.
The Cherokees had one of the worst events happen to them when the Indian removal Act was enacted. The scheming of the American government, which was the action of convincing a number of Cherokee people to sign over land to the federal government, was accomplished by the Federal government. There were very little things that were gained by the Cherokee in the act they lost more than they gained by selling their lands and falling prey to the trickery of the North American Government.
The defining moment when all the native American Indians were now no longer eligible to stay in their homes the act known as the Indian Removal Act of 1830. This policy was the decision of not only the new North American people but that of the seventh president Andrew Jackson. This White Anglo-Saxon Protestant (WASP) president was the last barrier standing between the Native American Lands and New Americans, who would receive land when the Native American were removed. This Act was contracted to favor the new immigrants and dispense with the natives whose families, past, animals, way of live was already integrated and established in this locations.
First, The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was created by the “white” federal government,
to whom the Cherokee would fall victim, whose only goal was to acquire land to expand out west by the removal of Native Americans. This act came about because of the Louisiana Purchase that provided United States with more land; therefore render more expansion for this new “white” American population. This act was enforced by the military...

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