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The Enlightenment View Of Human Nature

1643 words - 7 pages

The Enlightenment View of Human Nature

The above issue shows ‘Access the enlightenment view of human nature.
What are the wider implications of different concepts of human nature?’
I have citied the main principles of this discussion and I have
understood the facts and yet there is so much so depends on our
conception of human nature.

In individuals the meaning and purpose of our lives and what we ought
to do or strive for, which may hope to achieve or even to become.
Whereas, in human societies vision the human community hoping to work
toward and what sort of social changes that we should make.

There are ways of finding out the idea that it is possible to identify
standards that correspond to fundamental facts about human beings and
may thus be described as ‘natural’ has played an important role in a
range of theories that have implications for the regulation of
political authority. In order to understand the regulatory role of an
appeal to ‘natural’ from those that focus on ‘nature rights’. Theories
of nature law identify a structure of exceptions and norms that are
not themselves the product of human intention or human will.

These norms serve to legitimate human action and to justify the
exercise of political authority. The natural law is held to be
‘natural’ in two related senses. In the first place, it is so
fundamental to human life that its binding force is a matter of moral
necessity rather than choice: to recognise that there is such a thing
as a ‘law of nature’ and to fail to abide by it is to fly in the face
of a standard that is intrinsic to humanity. Secondly, and as a
consequence of this, it is claimed that adherence to natural law is
supremely appropriate for human beings.

Above questions is fundamentally about human nature there are
disagreements aplenty such as “What is man thou art mindful of
him…Thou hast made him a little lower than the angels and hast crowned
him with glory and honour,” written by the author in Psalm 8 of Old
Testament.

The definite purpose of our life is to see human beings created by a
transcendent God and the argument directly goes back to the Christian
concept of original sin. Man (people who talk about human nature tend
to forget women completely) is a fallen animal born with the Mark of
Cain upon his brows whose only salvation lies outside the world in the
grace of God. Adam Smith used a secular version of this argument to
explain why the emerging capitalist society of eighteenth-century
Britain was natural and inevitable. He traced the origin of the market
economy to the “propensity in human nature…to truck, barter and
exchange”.

Human nature is our instinctive reactions and urges and the
preposition as to what we already are. The way in which we are
programmed to do certain things. Man creates the environment he...

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