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The Equtiy And Efficientcy Of Kidney Transplants

2606 words - 11 pages

Kidney disease is a very serious disease and many people in the United States aren’t aware of the effects of chronic kidney disease and the impact that it has on someone’s life. Many people are affected and don’t even know it; which leads to the major issue within the disease. Not every patient that may receive a transplant will have a good outcome. During post-transplant process some patients may experience graft loss after a short period after transplant. With organs being limited and with so many factors that cause a negative outcomes with kidney transplants; should there be limits to whom transplants should be given to or should every patient have a chance without regarding of age or outcome? The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network allocates organs and takes longevity into appreciation, but the Age Discrimination Act states that no one should be denied the chance of treatment because of age or outcome. In a few cases doctors won’t advise those that have a chance of complications for the option of transplant; but most of the time that’s prohibited to discriminate patients from pursuing the treatment.

Chronic Kidney disease is the reduction of the glomerular filtration rate and the increase of urinary albumin excretion, which is the loss of renal function over a period of months or years. Worldwide researchers have stated that the chance of death after renal transplants have decreased but other studies have stated that Chronic Kidney Disease is a serious public health issue throughout the world. In 1990 Worldwide was ranked 27th of cause of death but in 2010 moved to 18th on the list of the cause of death. The issue of transplants starts with prevention of the disease; by having screenings for people who are more at risk. Studies have shown that the risk factors of the cause of disease is diabetes, high blood pressure, older age, family history, and is more common in the minority groups. By earlier identifying the disease is needed to prevent disease progression and reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In developing countries the subject of awareness is fairly low in many communities, and the poorest areas are more at risk of the disease. Strategies to reduce the disease and costs related to the disease are in question to be included in the national programs for non-communicable diseases which can help support financial burden within the disease.
Kidney transplant is seen as a treatment of choice after the stage of kidney failure. Sometimes failure of transplant is due to the donor’s age or in bad health which can only let the recipient gain a few years of life. Now it brings us to the controversial idea of should patients be taken in consideration of the treatment of transplants because of age or to those who have a better outcome without complications? Or should every patient have equal treatment regarding age and outcome? Factors that cause complications of with transplants are...

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