The Important Role Of The Marabar Caves In A Passage To India

2984 words - 12 pages

The Important Role of the Marabar Caves in A Passage to India

 
    During the fourteen years that followed the publication of Howards

End, Edward Morgan Forster underwent a harsh mood change that culminated in

the publication of A Passage to India, Forster's bitterest book (Shusterman

159).  Forster was not alone in his transition to a harsher tone in his

fiction.  A Passage to India was written in the era that followed the First

World War.  George Thomson writes that the novel "may be viewed as a reaction

to the disappearance of God in the nineteenth century....  Twentieth century

writers have symbolized this world without God as a wasteland" (293).  Post-

war writers were appalled by the atrocities brought about by war and,

therefore, concluded that Earth is not overseen by a God.  Rather, they

believed that the world was, in a sense, empty.  Nowhere can this

emptiness be seen better than in the second of the novel's three major

sections, "Caves."  Thomson writes that this section is "a great wasteland

image in which...the Marabar expresses the nonexistence of God" (293). 

"Caves" begins as the story's major characters make a journey to the

mystifying Marabar Caves.  In the monotony, hollowness, and evanescent

beauty of the Marabar Caves is revealed a truth about the universe that

Mrs. Moore and Adela are unable to accept, but by which both characters

are affected, as well as Aziz, who may have suffered the most severe

consequences of the three. 

 

      Forster foreshadows the important role that the Marabar Caves

will play in A Passage to India in the novel's first line.  Forster writes,

"Except for the Marabar Caves - and they are twenty miles off - the city

of Chandrapore presents nothing extraordinary" (7).  Throughout the remainder

of the novel's opening section, Forster strategically places scattered

references to the "extraordinary caves" to ensure that the reader does not

forget about the important role that the caves will play.  In light of the

sprinkled references, Forster never really provides the reader with any

"meaningful" information about the caves. When Adela first learns of the

Marabar caves, she asks Aziz and Professor Godbole to describe them. 

Godbole makes the first attempt, but is unsuccessful.  Therefore, he says

to Aziz, "Well, why are they so famous?  We all talk of the famous Marabar

Caves.  Perhaps that is our empty brag" (75).  Not wanting to leave

Adela's request unanswered, Aziz also makes an attempt to describe what makes

the caves "extraordinary."  However, he, too, is unsuccessful:  "On he

chattered...further than ever from discovering what, if anything, was

extraordinary about the Marabar Caves" (76).  Once again, Forster arouses

the reader's interests in the caves.  Yet, at the same...

Find Another Essay On The Important Role of the Marabar Caves in A Passage to India

The Difficulty of English- Indian Friendship in "A Passage to India"

1591 words - 6 pages In his "A Passage to India", Forster explores the possibility of English-Indian Friendship. He begins and ends by posing the question of whether it is possible for an Englishman and an Indian to ever be friends, at least within the context of British colonialism.Thus, as soon as the novel opens, the reader is introduced to an argument, between Mahmoud Ali, Hamidullah, and, Aziz raising this English-Indian-friendship question. The argument is

A Passage to India Essay

1748 words - 7 pages sympathy and understanding. Additionally, in A Passage to India Forster reflects the relationship phases which occur between his characters through the use of the three main divisions -- Mosque, Caves, and Temple. The First division Mosque, a Muslim place of worship, is set in the fictional city of Chandrapore and brings about the first stage of human confrontation --Introduction. One of the first introductions Forster makes to the reader is the

A passage to india

1683 words - 7 pages E.M. Forster's A Passage to India concerns the relations between the English and the native population of India during the colonial period in which Britain ruled India. The novel takes place primarily in Chandrapore, a city along the Ganges River notable only for the nearby Marabar caves. The main character of the novel is Dr. Aziz, a Moslem doctor in Chandrapore and widower. After he is summoned to the Civil Surgeon's home only to be promptly

A Passage to India

1324 words - 5 pages portray the true nature of reality. The conflict between Adela, a young British girl, and Aziz, an Indian doctor, at the Marabar Caves is one that implements multiple modernist ideals and is placed in British-India. In this novel, Forster shows the relations and tension between the British and the Indians through a series of events that were all caused by the confusing effects of modernism. E.M. Forster implements such literary techniques to express

Alegory Of The Caves

663 words - 3 pages -Internet publications 4-work placement.I personally would like to study pharmacy . In my country there was a strict roll that says "every body should chose a study field according to the final average scores of their last year of their high school . " The last year of my high school included many subjects as Arabic language including the grammar, composition and dictation. English language including same as Arabic. Science, Biology, math, Geometry

Allegory Of The Caves

668 words - 3 pages -Internet publications 4-work placement. I personally would like to study pharmacy . In my country there was a strict roll that says "every body should chose a study field according to the final average scores of their last year of their high school . " The last year of my high school included many subjects as Arabic language including the grammar, composition and dictation. English language including same as Arabic. Science, Biology, math, Geometry

E M Forster and the British Raj in a Passage to India

1744 words - 7 pages The early years of the twentieth century saw the rise of the novel as a popular genre in the literature of the war-struck Edwardian England. Novelists like Joseph Conrad, E.M.Forster, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and D.H. Lawrence gave the form new dimensions. Among these writers E.M. Forster made a mark in the literature of his age through his last novel A Passage to India (1924), which was entirely different from Forster's other novels in that

A Passage to India

923 words - 4 pages India. In Bhagawhandi’s dream like sate, she saw visions of landscapes, villages, homes and gardens that she loved and knew as a child. Neurologists in the text inferred these temporal lobe seizures were due to the steroid she was receiving to keep the tumor under control. The massive doses of steroid are possibly causing toxicity within her system, resulting in the dreamy hallucination. However, it was crucial to continue giving her the

The mystery behind the fan boy In Foster's A passage to India, many characters appear throughout the novel. Some of them may have a

1304 words - 5 pages The mystery behind the fan boy. In Foster's A passage to India, many characters appear throughout the novel. Some of them may have a more important part to play in the story than others, but one minor character catches our attention: he is the punkah wallah or the fan boy. Even though he appears for a brief period, he serves a higher purpose which we will analyze and study closely. First, we will observe how the punkah wallah creates some

Compare the ways in which Frster and Sith present the relationships of Aziz and Fielding and Archie and Samad in "A passage to India"and "White Teeth"

2917 words - 12 pages Fielding does not. The projection by both writers is of a tolerant society.The emotional motivations in "White Teeth" are comparable with those in "A Passage to India. When Archie helps Samad get Magid to Bangladesh, he shows loyalty despite the fact that it is morally wrong. However, Fielding expresses not only loyalty but morality in his actions. When Fielding finally arrives at the Marabar Caves, Aziz's response is "Fielding! Oh, I have so wanted you

Analysis of the Film Passage of India

1900 words - 8 pages “A Passage to India” is a film released in 1984; however, the film was set in the 1920s. The film shows India under the British Raj during a time of animosity and the Indians’ anti-imperialist attitude. Furthermore, the film displays themes of prejudice and India on its journey of becoming its own independent nation. “A Passage to India” has a powerful message of the racism in India during the time of the British Raj and the message shines

Similar Essays

The Role Of Abuse In British India In Forster's Passage To India

1472 words - 6 pages In a Passage to India the author, E. M Forster sends the message of India’s mistreatment and misrepresentation by Britain. Throughout the novel, the reader is able to observe how British and Indian characters are treated differently. The author demonstrates the British perspective of Indians being the ignorant characters in the novel, whose company leads to troubles. Another aspect of the British perspective is that Indians are being treated as

Forster's "A Passage To India" The Mystery Of Mrs. Moore

1123 words - 4 pages renders her apathetic and even mean. After her departure, however, Mrs. Moore exists on a symbolic level. Despite her human flaws, she comes to symbolize a spiritual and race-blind openness that Forster sees as a solution to the problems in India. This symbolic side to Mrs. Moore might make her the heroine of the novel, but her literal actions—after the Caves experience—make her less than heroic.Bibliography:www.sparknotes.com/Forster/A Passage to IndiaForster's A Passage to India, Rama Brothers

An Inward Collapse Of The Human Perspective In Forster's A Passage To India

4013 words - 16 pages ). Hamidullah raises the question of how England, a country of declining morals, can justify holding India. Forster depicts the English as not having strong belief structures in order to allow them to be easily manipulated into "[...] complex bewilderment about social and spiritual identity" (Parry 160).   Through building the Marabar Caves up to be a significant element in the text and developing the idea of spiritual weakness on the part of

Comparing The Impact Of Colonization In A Small Place, A Passage To India, And Robinson Crusoe

1105 words - 4 pages Impact of British Colonization Exposed in A Small Place, A Passage to India, and Robinson Crusoe British colonialism began in the early fifteen hundreds and even continues today with the British rule of the British Virgin Islands.  For centuries, literature has served as a type of historical documentation of colonization as many authors wrote about colonization from both a colonized and a colonizer's point of view. During colonization, and