This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Ethics Of Sonography And Gendercide

1792 words - 7 pages

The constantly growing field of medical technology has raised many questions especially pertaining to ethics. The mapping of the human genome, cloning technologies, stem cell research, and of course reproductive technology has caused some very real dilemmas over the role of the human decision in the creation and orientation of new life. Humans are able to accomplish amazing things in science, but at what cost? The ubiquitous nature of reproductive technology has caused a new discipline of reproductive ethics. One such dilemma is that of selective abortion due to sex preference. In this paper I will discuss the ethics of gendercide and sonography’s affect on this practice
Sex-selective abortion is the practice of terminating a pregnancy based on the predicted sex of the fetus. The selective abortion of female fetuses is most common in areas where cultural norms value male children over female children, especially in parts of Taiwan, Korea, China, and India. A 2005 study estimated that over 90 million females were "missing" from the expected population in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, China, India, Pakistan, South Korea and Taiwan alone, and suggested that sex-selective abortion plays a role in this deficit. India eliminates over half a million healthy girl fetuses annually, simply because of their gender.
Amniocentesis and ultrasound techniques are the most common ways for couples to determine the sex of the child before it is born. In the US, such tests are routine and not usually alarming, but in nations such as India and China those tests, and others, have become an issue of debate since the results could mean life or death. Until the 1980’s, people in poor countries could do little about their preference for sons before birth, but in the 20th century ultrasound scanning and other methods of detecting the sex of a child before birth began to make their appearance. These technologies changed everything. Previously, parents would resort to infanticide to be sure they could have a boy. Now parents who wanted a son, but balked at killing baby daughters were able to choose abortion instead. Even today, there are no proven practices that allow gender detection during the first trimester, and ultrasound is fairly unreliable until approximately the 20th week of pregnancy. Consequently, sex selection often requires late term abortion of a fetus.
This practice not only affects the family but the society as a whole. It has caused an increase in the imbalances between sex ratios. Boys are slightly more likely to die in infancy than girls. To compensate, more boys are born than girls so there will be equal numbers of young men and women at puberty. In all societies that record births, between 103 and 106 boys are normally born for every 100 girls. The ratio has been so stable over generations that it appears to be the usual order of things. That order has changed drastically in the last 25 years. According to research the ratio today is 123 boys per 100...

Find Another Essay On The Ethics of Sonography and Gendercide

Business and the Notion of Ethics

1214 words - 5 pages the notion of ethics has been around for generations, it has been seen in religion and philosophy. Although it has only been in the last few decades that the business world has adopted this principle of doing the right thing, not just doing what will lead to most profits. The concept of ethics encompasses a ‘systematic’ process of considering the ‘moral consequences’ of ones actions, as stated by (text book). However there isn’t a succinct

The Ethics and Effectiveness of Exposure

1524 words - 6 pages Exposure therapy has garnered attention for its effectiveness and timeliness to cure diagnoses like posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias, and other anxiety disorders. Manuals have been created, self-help books have been published, and online support groups have been developed all for the purpose of establishing an exposure therapy community. Most of the literature around the ethics of it focuses on

Exodus and the Ethics of Labor

1560 words - 6 pages Oppression is something that has been repeated throughout history all over the world. Whether it was the oppression of Black Americans during the Jim Crow period or the oppression of Jews in Nazi Germany during World War II, oppression is an unethical act that humanity has not yet moved past. Looking to the Bible as a source of Christian ethics in terms of how to fight oppression and promote equality brings to attention how God intended His

Examining the Ethics of Plato and Aristotle

1051 words - 4 pages This essay will be examining the ethics of Plato (428-347 BCE) and Aristotle (384-322 B.C). I will firstly attempt to summarise the five fundamental concepts of Plato and Aristotle before providing my own opinion and view on their ethics. I will concentrate on their theories on the good life as a life of justice, censorship, knowledge and the good life. I will first examine Plato’s ethics. Plato was a philosopher who was both a rationalist

Ethics And The Pardon Of Mark Rich

643 words - 3 pages Last Minute Clinton Pardon Ethical? Enter one President and one fugitive from justice. In 1983 Marc Rich was charged with illegally buying oil from Iran while it was under a trade embargo. He was thought to have been trying to avoid oil price controls, evading nearly $50 million in federal taxes. After fleeing to Switzerland he was placed on the America's Ten Most Wanted List. 17 years later in the last hours of the Clinton presidency

Ethics and the Patentability of Human Genes

940 words - 4 pages Ethics and the Patentability of Human Genes This paper will discuss the protection of intellectual property. It will tell how intellectual property is protected and why it is important to protect. It will also discuss ethical issues that arise in dealing with protecting intellectual property and whether or not protections can go" too far". Intellectual property as described by Cornell University law school is "any product of the human

The Morals and Ethics of Genetic Engineering

3610 words - 14 pages Introduction Widely considered a revolutionary scientific breakthrough, genetic engineering has been on a path toward changing the world since its introduction in 1973 by Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer (What). However, as genetic engineering slowly permeates the lives of humanity, the morals and ethics behind what are now common practices are entering public attention, and as a culture we are left to question whether the change brought on by

Ethics and the Commercialization of Organ Transplants

1084 words - 4 pages lives this line can be pursued to a certain extent with appropriate regulations in place. Of all the normative ethics this decision is supported the best by utilitarianism which links actions’ ethicality to the degree of happiness they promote. However, this decision is also supported by Ethics of care which emphasizes on interdependence and relationships to achieve ethical goals. References Dougherty, C. J. (1986). A Proposal For

Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics

1506 words - 6 pages Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics In Book I of Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle states that the ultimate human goal or end is happiness. Aristotle describes the steps required for humans to obtain happiness. Aristotle states that activity is an important requirement of happiness. He states that a happy person cannot be inactive. He then goes on to say that living a life of virtue is something pleasurable in itself. The virtuous

The Benefits and Ethics of Human Cloning

1522 words - 6 pages The Benefits and Ethics of Human Cloning Introduction On February 24, 1997, the whole world was shocked by the news that Scottish scientists had successfully cloned a sheep. Dolly an artificially cloned mammal was born a star. After the shock, that cloning was not only a possibility but a reality, wore off the out cry against human cloning began. Physicians, scientists, politicians and church leaders and many more have been trying to ban

The Ethics of Divorce and Re-Marriage

1005 words - 4 pages The Ethics of Divorce and Re-Marriage Divorce is a legal termination of a marriage, leaving the couple free to remarry who they want. Re-marriage therefore is following a divorce, when one or both of the couple get married again to new partners. This is only when both partners have been divorced and are still alive. I am not sure whether I agree or disagree with this statement so I am going to look at the two sides of

Similar Essays

The Role Of Ethics And Social Responsibility

890 words - 4 pages Ethics Paper PAGE \* Arabic 2 Running Head-THE ROLE OF ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYThe importance of ethics in developing a strategic planJaime EnriquezMGT 498January 24, 2011Eligah KingThe importance of ethics in developing a strategic planBusiness ethics are becomingly more effective in the modern world of business, yet ethics and social responsibility are concerns misunderstood today. Organization's when confronted with issues that

Aristotle And The Book Of Nicomanchean Ethics

950 words - 4 pages Florida International University Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics Haley Beahn (2697300) PHI 2600 Professor Henry Maklakiewicz 16 April 2014 Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics In Book I of Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle states that the ultimate human goal or end is happiness. Aristotle then

The Ethics Of Work And Success

1205 words - 5 pages The ethics of work and success: The meaning of work to individuals has important influences on their behavior in organizations. They derive their basic values and beliefs about work from society at large, the family, their educational experiences, and many other sources. The Puritans, who were Calvinists by religious faith, brought what is known as the work ethic to the United States. The work ethic, sometimes called the Protestant Ethic

Aristotle And The Book Of Nicomanchean Ethics

2543 words - 11 pages Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics In Book I of Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle states that the ultimate human goal or end is happiness. Aristotle then describes steps required for humans to obtain the ultimate happiness. He also states that activity is an important requirement of happiness. A virtuous person takes pleasure in doing virtuous things. He then goes on to say that living a life of virtue is something pleasurable in itself