The Evolution Of Racism: To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1384 words - 6 pages

To Kill a Mockingbird is a true American classic of the time and one of those seminal works that shaped a generation. The world is an imperfect place; we all know that, this book is a superb example of this. It specifically states in the book “Ewells hate and despise the colored folks” (Lee 229). This being said why do they hate them? Is it a logical hatred or just a figment of the imagination? They hate them because they remind them of themselves; it is fear that drives them to hatred. If one sit downs and truly gets to the heart of our problems as humans everything stems from one central idea. Fear, fear starts wars, kills people, sparks racism, and dictatorships. Before this paper proceeds any farther I must note, I am not a racist, I have many African American friends and despise white trash just as much as black trash.
Why as humans do we fear only things that are different from us and what we know? Is it so difficult to conceive that a difference could be a good thing and not a bad one? The whites fear the blacks athletic ability. The blacks fear what they perceive as white dominance of the workplace, these fears lead to conflict. The outcome of this conflict in modern America is an imbalance; a racism against the whites of America that spreads like wildfire on a hot July day. A perfect example is the recent story about Clippers owner David Stern who made some comments about being around black people. I am in no way defending him but I would just like to note that had a black man said that about a white person it would have been a mute point, no one would have cared. However the blacks fear that comment thus it becomes a story. Fear can drive us to rushed action, like shooting a dog that probably didn't need to be shot. The whole town feared this dog, that looked sick even though it was the wrong time of year for rabies. The fear drove them to kill, not the animal, it didn't hurt a soul (Lee 95-100). I believe that in doing this Lee was trying to try a parallel between overreaction towards animals and overreaction towards different races.
I will be the first to tell you that racism in America during the sixties and seventies was all one side, whites hating blacks to the point that nothing made sense. How anyone could believe themselves too good to eat at the same dinner or go to the same school as another human being is completely ludicrous, as in the case of the Little Rock nine where parents went absolutely crazy due to the simple fact that black students would be allowed into their own children school. This confrontation caused tax dollars to be spent on protection of black students. The elite Special Forces unit, 101st Airborne where even sent in (Janken 1).
I believe that every qualified person should be allowed every opportunity they themselves earn. This being said no one, under any circumstances, should be given special treatment because they are a minority. Just because fewer African American’s apply to a college than...

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