The Failure Of The Berlin Blockade

2361 words - 9 pages

The Berlin Blockade
What were the main factors that ultimately led to the failure of the Berlin Blockade?

Word Count: 1957

TABLE OF CONTENTS
A. Plan of the investigation ……………………………………………………………………….. 3
B. Summary of Evidence …………………………………………………………………………. 4
C. Evaluation of Sources .…...…………………………………………………………………….. 6
D. Analysis ………………………………………………………………………………………... 8
E. Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………… 10
F. List of Sources ………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

A. PLAN OF THE INVESTIGATION
The aim of this investigation is to assess the main factors that ultimately led to the failure of the Berlin blockade, giving the Soviets no other choice but to end it. To evaluate the actions and policies of the Superpowers during the crisis that played a role in lifting the blockade. The extent to which the fact that the Western Allies did not respond with violence but with the airlift and its success was a main factor to its end will be assessed. The significance of the agreement made between the Soviets and the US in lifting not only the Berlin Blockade but also the Western counter blockade will also be evaluated. The reasons for the implementation of the blockade, the actions of the superpowers that do not contribute to the failure of the blockade and the consequences from this crisis will not be investigated. The analysis will be done by researching different views on the blockade’s failure and the events leading up to it. This analysis will be supported by a primary source, letters between the USSR and the US at the beginning of the crisis. This gives both American and Soviet perspectives. Other sources used for this investigation are books. The United States in Germany, 1944-1955 by Harold Vink and is used to give a revisionist view on the Berlin crisis after the event itself. Whereas Soviet Policy toward East Germany Reconsidered: The Postwar Decade by Ann L. Philips is used because it gives a post revisionist view on the crisis.

B. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE
The Berlin blockade was created as a result of “violation by the Governments of the United States of America, Great Britain, and France of agreed decision taken by the powers in regard to Germany and Berlin.” This violation was “the carrying out of a separate currency reform, in the introduction of a special currency of Berlin and in the policy of dismemberment in Germany,” which included the “designation of a separate Government for the western zones.” Russian Chief representative, Marshall Sokolovsky walked out of the Allied Control Council meeting and failed to schedule another meeting the next month. “On June 23 the Russians introduced their own currency for Berlin,” the East Mark to counter the Western currency, the West Mark which was introduced the next day. The new West Mark was given the same value as the East Mark, “leaving the door open for negotiations.” ...

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