The "Faster" Mc Revolution Of The 1950's

2046 words - 8 pages

In the 1950’s, one of the words to help describe America was faster. Americans craved faster cars, faster music, and faster lives. This was the perfect time for Ray Kroc to contribute his groundbreaking ideas for the fast food industry. At first, Ray Kroc was just a salesman for the Multimixer shake machine, while McDonald’s was just a single, small hamburger stand in San Bernardino, California, that offered quick service. Kroc saw the potential of this small stand (to which he had sold 8 Multimixers) operated by Richard “Dick” McDonald, and his brother, Maurice “Mac” McDonald. He signed a 99-year contract with the brothers and quickly noticed the immense success derived from the genius concept of the speedy, consistent restaurant. By 1965, McDonald’s was a franchise with over 700 restaurants scattered throughout America, and Ray Kroc had become a successful entrepreneur (Mcd). With an abundance of restaurants found almost anywhere in the country, McDonald’s was a major influence on the nation. With the large amount of restaurants, the company, understandably, picked up a share of critics along the way. Although some may have a negative perception on the role of McDonald’s, the emergence of this major fast food restaurant positively affected the culture of the 1950’s, and the decades following. It changed aspects of the nation’s restaurant industry, the daily life of Americans, and diversity within the workforce.
McDonald’s ultimately transformed the restaurant industry in two ways. For example, new way to franchise restaurants was born within the walls of McDonald’s. Ray Kroc spearheaded a new way to franchise with a more “we are in this together” attitude. While most franchisers during that time made money from franchisees buying expensive equipment from them, McDonald’s would show their franchisees where to buy equipment, for the sake of consistency. Kroc decided that his franchise would profit based on the success of each owner/ operator (Alderton, Matt). The inspiring entrepreneur always emphasized how significant it was to “’work together to work better’” (Alderton, Matt). Evidently, that is exactly what he did.
On the contrary, some businesspeople may have asked: why not profit from franchisee success, as well as profit as a supplier? It is the best of both worlds, right? Wrong. Ray Kroc knew that making money off the profits of each restaurant and being a supplier to them could be fatal to the franchise. For that reason, the sagacious entrepreneur decided that this avaricious path was not the way to go, and his franchisees should purchase cheap supplies from others. However, other businesses did choose this greedy route, and they soon experienced an extensive amount of difficulty (Kroc, Ray, and Robert Anderson).
Furthermore, McDonald’s brought change to the restaurant industry by becoming a consistent, countrywide restaurant chain. As the company began to expand, Kroc found himself in a predicament. He feared that restaurants on...

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