The Fatality Of The Couple In The Great Gatsby And Othello

2501 words - 10 pages

Romance and Tragedy, two themes becoming one, which delightfully compliment one another. In many romantic tragedy’s there is a past theme, which is laid out, so that the downfall is always due to an excess of love or passion and the couples are doomed down by some impediment. I will be examining the Fatality of the couple in two romantic tragedies, Shakespeare’s Othello, and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Researchers have long assumed that the reasoning for the fatality of the couple is due to the era of time which the story takes place, for Instance, one eminent scholar Martin Orkin assumed in "Othello and the 'Plain Face' of Racism”, his seminal work on Race in Othello, which states that there is ample evidence of the existence of colour prejudice in the England of Shakespeare's day. As Jordan himself puts it, “dark mood of strain and control in Elizabethan culture” (qtd. in Orkin 167). Another leading critic, Ornstein, argued that in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby “out of the shifting of opportunities from the West to Wall Street, Fitzgerald creates an American fable which redeems as well as explains romantic failure. ” (Ornstein 35). Ultimately, when it came to the issue of the fatality of the couple in the two works the basic assumption was that love played the most significant role in the fatality of the couples. A new body of research shows that there are many factors which contribute to the fatality of the couple, I argue that the fatality of the couple in the two works is merely based on the themes displayed in the play and the narrative because, ultimately the impediments that causes the tragic downfall of their relationships is jealously, love and race. On a closer inspection I will use these themes as a means to display the tragic downfall of both Gatsby and Othello’s relationships. As we examine the events leading to the fatality of the couples, as readers we will look at race in regards to the veil, ethnicity and color, we’ll examine how contributing characters play a roll in jealously and how this further provokes the main characters to displays actions he or she otherwise would not intend to produce, and lastly we will focus on the manipulation of love and jealousy.
Othello’s color is a constant problem from the beginning of the play, it causes an issue for his relationship with his wife Desdemona and with the individuals he surrounds himself with. Orkin argues that there is racist sentiment within the play, but that it is to an important degree confined to Iago, Roderigo, and Brabantio (Orkin 168). I agree with Orkin that there is a racist sentiment which exists in Othello and that it is confined to Iago, Roderigo and Brabantio because the other characters do not involve themselves with the scheme to destroy Othello and Desdemona’s relationship. Orkin continues his essay by suggesting that Iago and Rodrerigo use racist insinuations, in an attempt to putsch against Othello’s position and reputation (Orkin 168). It...

Find Another Essay On The Fatality of the Couple in The Great Gatsby and Othello

Use of Symbols and Symbolism in The Great Gatsby

1326 words - 5 pages Symbolism plays an important role in any novel of literary merit. In his novel The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald uses symbols to portray events, feelings, personalities and time periods. Throughout the narrative, Fitzgerald uses strong contrasting symbols such as West Egg and East Egg. His superior use of other predominant symbols such as color and light are also evident throughout the novel. The story begins as the narrator, Nick

Illusion and Reality in The Great Gatsby

1584 words - 6 pages Illusion and Reality in The Great Gatsby       The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, is a novel about one man's disenchantment with the American dream. In the story we get a glimpse into the life of Jay Gatsby, a man who aspired to achieve a position among the American rich to win the heart of his true love, Daisy Fay. Gatsby's downfall was in the fact that he was unable to determine that concealed boundary between reality and

Lies and Deciet in The Great Gatsby

1321 words - 5 pages Lying has deadly effects on both the individual who lies and those around them. This concept is demonstrated in The Great Gatsby. Although Gatsby, Tom and Myrtle have different motives for being deceitful, they all lie in order to fulfill their desires and personal needs. Myrtle’s desire to be wealthy is illustrated when she first meets Tom, dressed in his expensive clothing, as her attitude changes when she puts on the luxurious dress and when

Use of Metaphor, Symbols and Symbolism in The Great Gatsby

1327 words - 5 pages Use of Metaphor and Symbolism in The Great Gatsby       Some novels have more of an impact in modern society than when they were originally written. This is especially true with Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Modern society can be termed corrupt, complete with tainted morals and an overemphasis on the acquisition of money and friends. Fitzgerald seeks the root of the problem and wants the reader to ponder whether he or she wants money and

Symbols and Symbolism in The Great Gatsby

539 words - 2 pages Symbolism in The Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby is filled with symbols and symbolism, which try to convey Fitzgerald's ideas to the reader. The symbols are uniquely involved in the plot of the story, which makes their implications more real. There are three major symbols that serve very important significance in the symbolism of the novel. They are "the valley of the ashes," the reality that represents the corruption in the world, the

Comparison and Contrast in The Great Gatsby

1803 words - 7 pages Comparison and Contrast in The Great Gatsby       The success of Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby is in part due to his successful characterization of the main characters through the comparison and contrast of Daisy Buchanan and Myrtle Wilson, Tom Buchanan and George B. Wilson, and Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby. The contrast is achieved through two principle means: contrasting opposite qualities held by the characters and

Lies and Deceit in "The Great Gatsby"

1258 words - 5 pages Lying has deadly effects on both the individual who lies and those around them. This concept is demonstrated in The Great Gatsby. Although Gatsby, Tom and Myrtle have different motives for being deceitful, they all lie in order to fulfill their desires and personal needs. Myrtle's desire to be wealthy is illustrated when she first meets Tom, dressed in his expensive clothing, as her attitude changes when she puts on the luxurious dress and when

Lies and Deceit in The Great Gatsby

1258 words - 5 pages Lying has deadly effects on both the individual who lies and those around them. This concept is demonstrated in The Great Gatsby. Although Gatsby, Tom and Myrtle have different motives for being deceitful, they all lie in order to fulfill their desires and personal needs. Myrtle's desire to be wealthy is illustrated when she first meets Tom, dressed in his expensive clothing, as her attitude changes when she puts on the luxurious dress and when

Importance of Myrtle in The Great Gatsby

1199 words - 5 pages     Many of the occurrences in The Great Gatsby produced far-reaching effects for several of the characters.  Of these occurrences, one of the most influential and important incidents was the death of Myrtle Wilson.  While her life and death greatly affected the lives of all of the main and supporting characters, her death had a very significant effect on the lives of Tom, Daisy, and Gatsby.             Tom knew Myrtle better than any of

Nuances of Money in The Great Gatsby

1484 words - 6 pages No American writer has understood money more than F. Scott Fitzgerald has, says James L. W. West III . "He knows money has a deadening effect on morality. It insulates people from the pain of others." Fitzgerald's books seem to give a clear picture of the influence of money upon people's behaviour and relationships during that time. The Great Gatsby is his most reflecting book of his deftness in showing how money and class distinguish mattered

Impact of Prohibition in The Great Gatsby

2218 words - 9 pages this era was prohibition. In The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald explores the life of crime associated with prohibition causing the enormous transformation of Jay Gatz to Jay Gatsby, and also causing a tremendous change in America. During the 1920’s many different people had problems with dinking, and it was a very controversial topic for people in many different age groups. Patterson, New York’s website explains that from the early beginnings

Similar Essays

Comparing Othello And The Great Gatsby

1202 words - 5 pages All tragedies eventually end in chaos; however, Othello and The Great Gatsby both begin with innocent characters thinking little about the possibility of disarray. During the climax of both works it becomes evident that the idea of order is doomed, inevitably leading to a bounding spiral of problems. The Great Gatsby and Othello both end in chaos because the protagonists, Othello and Gatsby are outsiders entering an ordered society. The actions

A Comparison Of Othello And The Great Gatsby

1031 words - 4 pages Throughout history, women’s place and role in society has changed. Women are often seen as a lower status and have a need to be taken care of by men. There are conflicts with the idealization of women as they are often overlooked and viewed as secondary characters. This idealization is well established in the characters of Desdemona in Othello and Daisy in The Great Gatsby. In F.Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby and Shakespeare‘s play

The Obsessive Nature Of Desire Presented In The Great Gatsby, Othello And Enduring Love

2886 words - 12 pages Obsession is defined as “an unhealthy and compulsive preoccupation with something or someone” (1), and is a prominent theme (in) The Great Gatsby, Enduring Love and Othello. For example, in all three, there is a great desire to obtain things which are unattainable, and in turn this fuels their obsession and causes it to intensify. Furthermore, the act of being obsessive is a common human characteristic, which enforces the fact that obsession is

Greed In The Great Gatsby And The Grapes Of Wrath

1179 words - 5 pages The Modernist movement took place in a time of happiness, a time of sadness, a time of objects, a time of saving, a time of prosperity, a time of poverty and in a time of greed. Two novels, written by Steinbeck and Fitzgerald, portray this underlying greed and envy better than most novels of that period. These novels, The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath, show that despite the difference between the 1920s and the 1930s, greed remained a