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The Fear Of Science Portrayed In Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde", Well's "The Time Machine", And Shelley's "Frankenstein"

1445 words - 6 pages

To live in the today's world is to be surrounded by the products ofscience. For it is science that gave our society color television, thebottle of aspirin, and the polyester shirt. Thus, science has greatlyenhanced our society; yet, our society are still afraid of the effect ofscience. This fear of science can be traced back to the nineteenth centurywhere scientist had to be secretative in experimenting with science.Although science did wonders in the nineteenth century, many people fearedscience and its effects because of the uncertainty results of science.Our thrist for science can be traced back through many decades.However, the nineteenth century society felt that science was a greatinvestment towards a better life. This investment in science gave thenineteenth century society the discovery of light waves and radio waves,the electric motors, the first photograph and telephone, and the firstpublication of the periodic table. Science also caused an uproar insociety when Charles Darwin published The Origin of Species, which becamethe scientific basis for the study of the evolution of humans. Many peoplein the nineteenth century detested Darwin's theory of the evolution of manbecause it went against their religion, which believed that God created theworld. Science, soon, developed the big bang theory, which states thatearth was created by the attraction of atoms. The nineteenth centurysociety was afraid of science because it contradicted their beliefs, andwas afraid that the results of science would lead to the destruction ofmankind. Thus, the study of science was limited because of fear of itseffects.The fear of the effects of science was expressed in literature.Novels like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the Time Machine, and Frankensteinshowed the dangers of science and that science would soon lead to thedestruction of mankind.The novel Frankenstein is about a man name Victor Frankenstein whowanted to tamper with life and death by 'exploring unknown powers, andunfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation.' (Frankenstein, pg.40)He acquired the knowledge of science when he attended the university ofIngolstadt, and once the knowledge of science was gained, Frankenstein wentto his secret laboratory to create a creature with gigantic stature. Atfirst, Frankenstein had doubts about creating a human being; however, with'the improvement which every day takes place in science and mechanics, [he]was encouraged to hope [his] present attempts would at least lay thefoundation of future success.' (Frankenstein, pg.47) Once Frankensteincreated his human being, his dream was vanished because he had accomplishedhis dream. His dream of creating a human being soon turned into a nightmare.For Frankenstein created a monster who had no identity, and was willing tomurder all of Frankenstein's loved ones if Frankenstein did not createanother female creature. Victor Frankenstein refused to create anotherfemale monster to accompany his monster. Thus, the monster felt...

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