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The Features Of Landscape Urbanism Essay

658 words - 3 pages

Landscape Urbanism is best equipped to assist Lyndon’s “multiplicity of cultures seeking at once to find their way in the present and to forge their place in the future” because it positions landscape “as the most relevant meduim for the production and representation of contemporary urbanism.” The interdisciplinary model it uses is one which positions landscape as the generator, rather than backdrop, of urban development. The public landscape infrastructure organizes and shapes urban development rather than the other way around. Not to be mistaken as landscape architects. They distance themselves from landscape architecture in two ways:
- first landscape architecture's legacy of the picturesque which foregrounds formal and pictorial representations and
- secondly from the environmental determinism of the 1960s and 70s which gave ecology a central role as evidenced strongly in the work of Ian McHarg.
Landscape urbanism is a viable less formulaic and more site specific alternative to New Urbanism or Everyday Urbanism because of the conflation of cultural and natural process and the incorporation of humans into ecological systems. Landscape urbanism will in future, with its temporal and political characteristics, set the scene (albeit momentary) for democracy in action.

Everyday Urbanism is best equipped to assist Lyndon’s “multiplicity of cultures seeking at once to find their way in the present and to forge their place in the future” because their goal is clearly stated: to celebrate and build on ordinary life with little pretense about the possibility of a perfectible or ideal environment. They celebrate the ability of indigenous and migrant groups to respond in resourceful and imaginative ways to ad hoc conditions and marginal spaces. It begins with respecting and honoring the daily ritual and cycles that shape communities. While its aim is to help people adapt and improvise, often in spite of physical design and planning. They also posses the ability to fly below the organized financial radar and work in the gaps and on the margins, which has allowed it to empower...

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