The First Amendment. Essay

2209 words - 9 pages

The First Amendment EssayCourse: American Government I.Professor: Dr. Steven ShirleyCongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.-- The First Amendment to the U.S. ConstitutionStudent: Jessica MenjivarThe First Amendment of the United States Constitution states: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." There are many things that I can say about this amendment. Let me begin by speaking of freedom of religion. There is a lot of controversy with religion in schools. For example the case from the University of North Carolina all incoming freshmen had to read a book about Islam. It included 35 translated sections of the Quran, the holy book of Islam. If the students did not agree with reading the book then they were required to write a one-page paper stating their objections. I feel that was wrong and that shouldn't have been a requirement at all. If the students didn't take a class on Islamic religion then they shouldn't have to go through that hassle. Requiring the students to write a paper on their objections to reading the book shouldn't have been an issue if it was never on the curriculum to begin with. I feel that it is okay to practice religion in schools as long as the students agree and voluntarily enrolled in that class. I completely agree with the three students and the conservative Christian organization that filed the lawsuit against the University Of North Carolina.Another debate with religion is prayer in schools. I don't see a problem with it as long as it doesn't interfere with the education of other students. As parents we raise our children differently but all with ethics and values. If my child chose to pray in school I don't see a reason why she shouldn't, the same thing goes for the Pledge of Allegiance. That has been a tradition of our country for years; I myself have pride in it. If any child in school were to feel uncomfortable with saying or hearing the Pledge of Allegiance they should just step out of the classroom. I just don't see a reason to ban it from schools just because of the simple phrase "under God". With the case that I am about to discuss it states that many school leaders were afraid to touch religion. That's why they had the problem with so many schools violating the law either by unconstitutionally promoting religion or by unconstitutionally denying the religious-liberty right of students. Now with the new law that passed this year all faculty members must remain neutral on their treatment of religion. The constitutional grounds for students are different,...

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